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Uncovering racism in our local history

SMASH! A chunk of ice sails through the glass of the Chuong Sun Laundry in downtown Lindsay as belligerent, racial slurs echo from one side of the street to the other.

CRASH! A young man armed with a brick obliterates another window as the crowd about him thunders with approval. More vituperative, racist rumblings erupt into a roar of hate as whatever projectiles rioters can gather from the street are lobbed into the aforesaid laundry, above which laundryman Lee Ten Yun hides.

By the wee small hours of February 1, 1919, the vandals’ victims included not only the Chuong Sun Laundry, but also a restaurant and another business operated by members of Lindsay’s Chinese community.

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Community anger growing with long wait times at LifeLabs

in Community/Health by
“This isn’t right. I’ve seen people with canes falling over.” Photo: Roderick Benns.

Outrage over long wait times at Lindsay’s LifeLabs – the only such laboratory in Kawartha Lakes – is growing.

The Advocate has fielded several emails and calls from residents who are increasingly frustrated not only with the wait times but with the conditions of their wait. According to several people who were standing in line, chairs are not provided for those who may need a break from standing and people are forced to be outside — even in inclement weather.

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Reduced city services show more money needed from federal partners

in Editorials by

At the end of July, Mayor Andy Letham warned that people were “going to notice” the service cuts that were coming. Ditching and brushing, grass-cutting and street sweeping, service centres and arenas — all  of this and maybe more affected by the pandemic.

This is utter nonsense for citizens to have to accept.

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Pandemic shows true picture of homelessness in Kawartha Lakes

in Community by
Pandemic shows true picture of homelessness in Kawartha Lakes
Less couch surfing happened after COVID-19, exposing the area's homelessness challenge.

On the surface, it would seem that the pandemic created a surge in homelessness in Kawartha Lakes. Indeed, A Place Called Home did see its client base increase three-fold since COVID, says its interim executive director, David Tilley.

As reported in The Advocate earlier this week safety protocols at the start of the pandemic lead to the closure of the agency’s 19-bed shelter. This meant relocating those residents – and any new, additional ones – into local motels. Since then, the agency is consistently providing rooms for between 45 and 55 individuals.

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A view from Parliament Hill: What the heck is prorogation?

in Federal by
When former prime minister Stephen Harper prorogued parliament there were mass demonstrations -- including one in Montreal where a young Liberal leader named Justin Trudeau attended.

To understand prorogation, we must first have a quick refresher on the parliamentary cycle.

Following an election, the party with the most seats in the House of Commons is to ask the Crown, represented by the Governor General in our case, to form government.

This is a formality, as the Crown rarely rejects this request. The next step is for the new government to lay out what it plans to provide for Canadians.

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Schmale appointed shadow minister for families, children, and social development

in Federal by

Local MP Jamie Schmale was appointed today as shadow minister for Families, Children and Social Development by Conservative Party of Canada leader Erin O’Toole.

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Homeless shelter needs re-imagining, says city manager

in Municipal by
Homeless shelter needs re-imagining, says city manager

Hope Lee, manager of human services–housing, shared a report with council laying out in stark terms the homelessness crisis in Kawartha Lakes, and how it has been affected by the pandemic.

She also shared how a re-imagination of A Place Called Home, the area’s only homeless shelter, might positively impact the number of beds available for those who have nowhere to go.

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Charitable road tolls and backyard chickens: Council presentation

in Municipal by

Aaron Sloan, manager of municipal law enforcement for Kawartha Lakes, had charitable toll roads and chickens on his mind in a recent presentation to council.

Charitable road tolls are typically when a group of people takes over a major intersection in Lindsay and when the flow of traffic allows, solicits donations from the people waiting to drive through.

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Council briefs: Cultural centre, road improvements, traffic calming

in Municipal by

Deferral of Cultural Centre Task Force

Donna Goodwin, economic development officer for arts, culture and heritage, asked council to defer the viability study of a Kawartha Lakes cultural centre until March 31, 2021.

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City to consider CHEST fund money for local charities

in Municipal by

When the town of Lindsay sold their hydro-electric company decades ago to Ontario Hydro there was a decision made that the money made from that sale should be invested for the benefit of the community.

Town council made a decision that every year a portion of that investment plus interest would be doled out to assist worthy groups planning capital projects of significance that would benefit residents of Lindsay proper.

In the many years since that wise investment was made, millions of dollars have been distributed to assist community based organizations that provide programs, projects, services or activities that enhance the quality of life for residents in the areas of health, arts, culture, leisure, heritage, education and the environment.

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Lake Simcoe Conservation Authority pushes for less winter salting

in Environment/Municipal by
“The problem that commercial users face is the fear of litigation if there is a slip and fall.”

Mike Walters, the chief executive officer of the Lake Simcoe Region Conservation Authority, has said that in 60 years Lake Simcoe could become toxic from over-salting if something isn’t done soon.

Walters was addressing council at their committee of whole meeting about the work being done by the conservation authority to reduce the damaging use of salt during the winter months across Ontario.

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