Kawartha Lakes' Finest Magazine

Community/Municipal

Local man excited about possibility of outdoor rinks for hockey, skating

Allen Irvine grew up in Lindsay playing hockey every opportunity he could. Now, years later with children of his own, Irvine would like to see Kawartha Lakes expand the options for children to get out and play a game of shinny by considering the construction of an outdoor ice rink for community use during the winter months.

“I have played hockey my whole life,” Irvine said. “I have kids of my own now and there is nowhere to play hockey outside in Kawartha Lakes. With this new (COVID) world we are living in I think the rink would be well used and it is something we should do.”

Keep Reading

Family Cooking Project has kicked off at Kawartha Lakes Food Source

in Health/Social Issues by
Amelia Boyd, Community Program Coordinator of KLFS packing the first round of meal kits for participants of the Family Cooking Project
Amelia Boyd, Community Program Coordinator of KLFS, packing the first round of meal kits for participants of the Family Cooking Project

Thanks to private donors, the Kawartha Lakes Food Source (KLFS) is excited to announce the launch of the Family Cooking Project as a permanent full-time program of their organization.

Each eight-week session of the Family Cooking Project provides ten local families with recipes, non-perishables, fresh ingredients and the one-on-one support they need in order to produce three healthy and delicious meals a week. Clients will also receive, free of charge, the kitchen equipment that is required to prepare all recipes.

Keep Reading

Kawartha Lakes to move forward with community safety and well-being plan

in Community/Municipal by
Kawartha Lakes to move forward with community safety and well-being plan

Right across Ontario an increasing number of people who are socio-economically disadvantaged or neuro-divergent are becoming involved in tragic incidents with law enforcement – many that could have been prevented with the proper interventions beforehand.

By July 1, Kawartha Lakes will have a community safety and well-being plan in place that recognizes and assists vulnerable groups and neighbourhoods throughout the city to lessen the severity of these interactions in the future.

Keep Reading

Unions have a long, proud history of fighting for workers’ rights

in Social Issues by
Nine union members standing outside of the Central East Correctional Facility in Lindsay ON
Nine OPSEU members who work at the Central East Correctional Centre. Pictured are S. Dunn, M. Reade, R. Gilchrist, J. Guthrie, M. Sedgwick, S. Nelson, B. Bisso, K. Semple, and D. Troost. Photo: John Maclennan.

Few topics in politics are as divisive, even in polite company, as unionization. While Canadian courts have consistently upheld, and on more than a few occasions greatly expanded the rights of unions, affinity for organized labour has ebbed and flowed since the Royal Commission on the Relations of Labour and Capital said, “the man [person] who sells labour should, in selling it, be on an equality with the man [person] who buys it” in 1889.

The Royal Commission recognized the inherent power imbalance of industrial capitalism even as industrialization was creating an explosion in the size of the Canadian working class.
Keep Reading

Belonging to a union is good for your health

in Health/Social Issues by
Belonging to a union is good for your health

Living and working conditions are the primary factors that shape whether individuals stay healthy or become ill; they are much more important than biological markers or behavioural choices. This truism applies to just about every physical, mental or social affliction that one may encounter. The term social determinants of health (SDOH) has come to stand for these living and working conditions that include income, housing, food security, unemployment, job security and working conditions, as well as the health care system and the social safety net, among others. The health care, public health and civil society sectors all accept this conclusion.

Keep Reading

City council prepares to move municipality to level orange

in Health/Municipal by
If Kawartha Lakes moves to orange level, downtowns and other community businesses will get to re-open. Photo: Jessica Topfer.

Chief Administrative Officer for Kawartha Lakes, Ron Taylor, told council recently that while the city is looking forward to reopening on Feb. 16, citizens should expect continued restrictions as the city will likely be designated orange under the current provincial re-opening framework in the continuing battle to limit COVID-19 and its variants’ spread.

The colour orange in the province’s framework means enhanced measures are still in place, there are restrictions on the number of people who can gather at businesses (which get to open again) or in homes, and enforcement while avoiding any closures.

“It has been a couple of months since my last report,” Taylor said, “and this report is in response to the provincial re-opening announcement made on Feb. 8.”

Keep Reading

March break now April break; Octoblocks not certain for the fall, says board

in Education by

Education Minister Stephen Lecce has postponed March Break, so that schools can help to limit community transmission, according to the education minister. The break will happen the week of April 12-16 instead.

“I recognize that this is one more change in a year that has been challenging for so many students and our education staff who continue to work so hard,” he said, but added he acted on the “best advice of public health officials.”

Keep Reading

Basic income is needed to underpin a fairer society

in Opinion/Social Issues by
Basic income is needed to underpin a fairer society

The year 2020 has demonstrated why the expression “May you live in interesting times” is seen as a curse. As the world reeled under the loss of life, economic impacts and the removal of opportunities many of us have taken for granted, the desire to move back to more stable times has appeared attractive.

Yet the chaos we continue to live through also offers us a chance to reimagine the world we live in — to challenge the dominant presumptions we entered the pandemic with, and to implement new policies to ensure we build forward better.

Keep Reading

2020/2021 International Plowing Match and Rural Expo is moving forward

in Events by
Plowing

Directors and staff of the Ontario Plowmen’s Association (OPA) are proud to announce that they will be moving forward with plans for the 2020/2021 International Plowing Match (IPM) and Rural Expo.

OPA looks forward to welcoming visitors to the City of Kawartha Lakes from Oct. 13-16. The IPM will be hosted at the Lindsay Exhibition and neighbouring farms.

Keep Reading

PSWs don’t need COVID test for home-based care, unlike long-term care counterparts

in Health by
PSWs don’t need COVID test for home-based care, unlike long-term care counterparts

A Little Britain woman is concerned there are different rules for personal support workers (PSWs) who see people in their own homes versus the PSWs who work in retirement and long-term care.

Namely, says Renee Aucoin, PSWs who provide homecare do not have to have to take a COVID test. Instead, they rely on self-evaluation – something that doesn’t sit well with her, considering her grandmother relies on home care.

Keep Reading

Benns’ Belief: Labour’s fight is our fight

in Opinion by
Labour

The full-time factory job that paid you a living wage in the early 1980s is a relic now. A person of the working class today or — dare I say it — those looking to join the middle class — cannot pay rent, buy food, have a car, or pay for insurance, and still have a little left over to feel human. That’s because, when accounting for inflation, real wages haven’t increased in nearly 40 years. People lurch from one gig job to another — and our youngest working generations have never experienced any other reality.

Keep Reading

Go to Top