Winner – New Business of the Year

Lindsay and area does not have the highest teen pregnancy rates
Community/Health

Lindsay and area does not have the highest teen pregnancy rates

If you’ve lived in in Lindsay or Kawartha Lakes long enough, you probably have heard an urban myth presented as fact: that Lindsay has the highest per capita rates of teen pregnancy in the province.

I know I have heard it and if I’m honest about it I’ve probably repeated it in the past, passing on this “statistic” as some sort of social commentary.

Keep Reading

Academy Theatre names new GM, four new board members

in Community by
New Academy Theatre General Manager, Craig Metcalf.

The Academy Theatre has named a brand new GM for the new year, along with four new board members — including Lindsay + District Chamber of Commerce President, Bob Armstrong.

In a message sent out widely by email, Academy Theatre Foundation Chair, Mike Piggott, says Craig Metcalf will be the new general manager.

Keep Reading

Living clean and sober: A tale of recovery from the grip of drugs

in Health/Opinion by
Living clean and sober: A tale of recovery from the grip of drugs
Timber Masterson. "Getting fully clean was the best thing I ever did for me."

Addiction to drugs runs rampant in Lindsay and towns just like Lindsay. It’s all around us — you just have to look a little.

You tell yourself that you have a handle on it, that it’s not so bad. You catch yourself looking down at that scarred arm. And those twitches you have…there was a time when they weren’t part of the package.

Keep Reading

The Sitcom called ‘Living with Mom in Lindsay’

in Opinion by
The challenge has been for me to find some kind of existence...aside from the role of this Norman Bates Psycho situation.

Being a chauffeur is just one of my important jobs. There’s line cook, personal shopper, super snow-shoveller, not to mention a whole slew of Viking-like tasks and Herculean daily errands that come under the heading of “Welcome to the Mother and Son Show.”

This is life with mom.

I can’t be the only 50-something adult that is helping to look after his mother in small town Ontario. Where are you people?! We should have some kind of support group going! (Is there one? I don’t know as I’m too busy shovelling snow…)

Keep Reading

First-year university student collects gifts for women staying at Women’s Resources

in Community by

“You don’t really guess that a lot of stuff could happen in a small town. People kind of turn a blind eye to it.”

These are the words of Raina McCue, an 18-year-old, first-year student of psychology at Trent University, regarding abuse and trauma suffered by women and their families. The month of December, while most often associated with the joys and giving spirit of the holiday season, is also the marker of a more somber occasion.

Keep Reading

Charity or justice? The society we want means choices must be made

in Opinion by
We are all linked together, one and all, by our belief that we should treat each other well.

Back in October I asked the federal candidates a simple question during the televised debates. Do you believe in charity or do you believe in justice?

In other words, how best can we meet our needs as a society? Is it through better social policies so that no one is left behind, or is it through a belief and expectation that someone else will be there to help out if it’s really needed? (“Someone” generally being charities and church efforts.)

Keep Reading

We need some Christmas cheer

in Opinion by
The Ramones. Plismo [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)]

No one ever accused me of being the biggest fan of Christmas. Heck, the kids just picked me up a Sally-Ann gem: a T-shirt with Darth Vader in a Santa hat below the word ‘humbug!’ It’s the only Christmas thing I own that’s (in the words of Farley Mowat) worth the powder to blow it all to hell.

Keep Reading

Ring the bells that still can ring

in Community/Just in Time by
Ring the bells that still can ring
St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church. Photo: Roderick Benns.

It’s a warm spring day in London, England. Sunday May 19, 2019, to be precise. My cousin, his girlfriend, and I have just left the famous Globe Theatre where we took in a performance of William Shakespeare’s Henry V.

After walking some distance, we come within sight of Southwark Cathedral, its 13 bells ringing out across the nearby River Thames. (As Charles Dickens, who watched Southwark’s bell-ringers over 150 years ago, reported, “the tenor’s voice becomes louder and louder, the ladder and walls shake more and more, until at last, as we are going to step onto the platform of the bells, we shrink back as from a blow, from the stunning clash of sound with which he greets us.”)

Keep Reading

There is no ‘them’ when we’re all in this together

in Community by

Exhibit 1: Trevor Berkan was the kind of person people around Southey, Sask., described as always putting others first. He died of an aortic dissection at the tragically young age of 41 in September, leaving much of the family farm’s crop unharvested.

Neighbours immediately designated a Saturday to finish the harvest and without anyone formally calling for help, 50 people and 17 combines showed up — more help than could be used, at a time when everyone also needed to get their own crops in.

Keep Reading

Remembering Dave Auger

in Community/Education by
Dave Auger, circa 1984. I.E. Weldon year book.

It was a small gesture, in a way, but one that affected the rest of my life, as small gestures so often do. The time was the mid-1980s, and I was in Grade 12 at I.E. Weldon. I wasn’t a great math student, but for some reason I was still taking functions and relations, with David Auger — well, he was Mr. Auger to us, of course — as my teacher.

I thought he was nice enough; he seemed kind, if awkward, and he encouraged me despite my lack of aptitude for his subject.

Keep Reading

1 2 3 4 5 85
Go to Top