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TLDSB tells province it is concerned with fewer teachers, mandatory e-learning
Education

TLDSB tells province it is concerned with fewer teachers, mandatory e-learning

The Trillium Lakelands District School Board has written to the minister of education, Stephen Lecce, about the unique challenges facing our local board in wake of provincial cuts to education.

The letter comes on the heels of an Advocate opinion piece that questioned why the local school board was not doing more to advocate on behalf of local students. For instance, a few Greater Toronto Area boards wrote letters directly to the minister to share their concerns.

TLDSB chair of the board, Bruce Reain, told the Advocate that TLDSB largely relies on the Ontario Public School Boards Association (OPSBA) to represent its interests.

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Ross Memorial will ‘continue to operate as a hospital:’ CEO Veronica Nelson

in Community/Health/Opinion by

Ross Memorial Hospital has been in the process of updating its special act (‘the bill’), one of the many pieces of legislation that governs our operations. We are all invested in protecting our hospital, and I have heard many questions about how the bill could impact RMH’s future, and hope to provide our community with an update and answers below.

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Debut of Advocate podcast generates (down) loads of positive feedback

in Community by

Advocate publisher Roderick Benns admits he was a bit tentative the night before his news site’s newest venture – The Advocate Podcast: Stories from Kawartha Lakes – launched February 15.

“We’d had many meetings, a lot of back-and-forth, and more than a few phone calls about the content, the direction and tone of the podcast,” he says. “But, really, you can only do so much of that. Eventually, you just have to put it out there, take a breath, and let the audience respond.”

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Corporate pressure ended postal banking in 1968 — it’s time to bring it back

in Business/Community by
Like many small places, Reaboro has no bank but it does have a post office. Photo: Roderick Benns.

One of the very first things that the new Dominion of Canada did as a country, way back in April 1868, was create a postal bank. The idea was to create a banking system that Canadians could access easily — and to serve customers that the established banks of the time showed little interest in, namely lower-income customers and those in remote communities.

Successful lobbying by the banking industry led to the elimination of the postal bank in 1968. Virtually all of the key players in our current postal system — Canada Post; Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) and the Canadian Postmasters and Assistants Association (CPAA) — have examined the idea of re-establishing a postal bank.

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Lindsay woman starts Go Fund Me campaign after theft of Humane Society money

in Community by
Kymie Lewis with Teddy.

Kymie Lewis is a big-time animal lover.

So when she heard that a man walked into a business on Angeline Street North in Lindsay and stole a donation box a few days ago from a cupcake sale that was intended for the local Humane Society, she wanted to take action.

“There are a couple reasons why I did this,” she tells the Advocate.

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More than 100 Canadian leaders sign ‘Justice for Soli’ letter for Premier Doug Ford

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Powerless guards mired in poor working conditions at Lindsay’s Super Jail

Senator Kim Pate, journalist and human rights activist Desmond Cole, executive director Harsha Walia of the BC Civil Liberties Association, and CEO Chris Summerville of the Schizophrenia Society of Canada, are among prominent names signed to an open letter to Ontario Premier Doug Ford calling for an open, thorough and transparent investigation into the death of Soleiman Faqiri.

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Basic income: Senator Kim Pate urges Senate to take action

in Poverty Reduction by
Senator Kim Pate urges Senate to take action on basic income

Senator Kim Pate is urging senators to take action on supporting the implementation of a basic income in Canada.

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Crossing the threshold: Lindsay’s House of Refuge

in Just in Time by

During my high school years, I had the opportunity to accumulate my requisite volunteer hours at Victoria Manor, Lindsay’s oldest nursing home. It’s a bright and airy place, complete with a large atrium, a fine chapel, activity rooms and four wings — Elford, MacMillan, Vaga and Victoria — in which residents live and enjoy each other’s company.

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Kawartha Lakes This Week building up for sale

in Community by

Team Brad Bird has listed 192 St. David St. in Lindsay – the home of Kawartha Lakes This Week – up for sale.

The Advocate reached out to the realtor’s office to find out if it would be vacant before a new buyer purchased it and they said it would be.

But in a brief interview with the Advocate, Mary Babcock, the regional general manager of This Week who is based in Peterborough, says “that hasn’t been agreed upon.”

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Where is our local voice? School board should speak out about Ford’s classroom plans

in Education/Opinion by
Where is our local voice? School board should speak out about Ford’s classroom plans

These are tumultuous times in education in Ontario. Regular strike action from educators these past few months is drawing attention to the Conservative government’s plans for education, which involve larger class sizes, e-learning without clear regard for planning and internet infrastructure, and a suggested pay raise for educators far below inflation.

Education workers don’t much like the government’s plan; neither, apparently do parents.

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