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Strumbellas’s James sees coming to aid of Academy as payback to theatre

in The Arts by

After years of touring the world with an internationally-recognized and highly-respected band, Darryl James decided it was time to come home.

James, bass player for The Strumbellas, and wife Robyn are raising their three children in Lindsay, where he grew up.

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Outdoor professional theatre: Fenelon ampitheatre aims to be big tourism draw

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The Grove Theatre — a new outdoor amphitheatre in Fenelon Falls – will be home to an all-new summer festival of live performances.

Created under the auspices of the Kawartha Works Community Co-operative (KWCC), with construction funding from the Ontario Trillium Foundation and additional support from members of the local community, The Grove Theatre has been conceived to engage and inspire both visitors and local residents, according to a press release.

“The annual festival will bring new vitality not only to Fenelon Falls itself but to the whole region of Kawartha Lakes,” the release states.

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Strumbellas’ drummer steps in front of mic with new solo album

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Jeremy Drury. Photo: Mike Oksman.

After close to a decade touring with The Strumbellas, Lindsay-raised drummer Jeremy Drury is stepping out of his comfort zone and in front of the microphone to share his voice and stories.

A project years in the making, Drury shared the exclusive premier of his first single “Pour Another” with the Lindsay advocate in 2018. Since then, has found time during this world-wide downtime to finalize his debut solo album.

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James Barker to headline concert to Benefit Academy Theatre

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The Academy Theatre is in serious trouble, according to a media release, and the theatre is hoping  James Barker and a cadre of special guests might save it.

As with many arts and culture organizations, COVID-19 has had a devastating impact on the future viability of the city’s performance hub, having left the building dark since mid-March.

With hopes of reopening slowly and with severely limited operational capacity in the spring, more than a year will have passed since closing its doors to the public. As an independent performing arts venue with no government support, the Academy Theatre’s lifeblood is in events, fundraising, and donations supported by the community.

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Young recording artist doesn’t let Muscular Dystrophy slow his musical journey

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Caleb Frazier describes his music as Christian hip hop.

When local recording artist, Caleb Frazier, describes music as a social media, it at first feels like he is minimizing the art form. After all, Instagram and Snapchat may be present at almost every human experience from weddings and funerals to wars and halftime shows, but they are documenting these experiences, not fuelling them.

The 19-year-old Virginia native has lived in Cameron the last three years. (His mother married a Canadian and moved north of the 49th parallel.)

Frazier points out that music remains a means of entertaining, teaching, and protesting, but it has been democratized.

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Globus fundraising campaign looks to raise $200,000 with help of foundation

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Lakeview Arts Barn, home of Globus Theatre.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Globus Theatre was forced to cancel their 17th season of professional summer theatre. With 60 per cent of their annual $500,000 budget being derived from ticket sales it has meant a huge financial loss to the company and left this Ontario Summer Theatre facing an uncertain future.

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Anarchy in Kawartha Lakes: A local history of punk rock

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Anarchy in Kawartha Lakes: A local history of punk rock

Part One

Where there is young people and vitality, you’re going to find punk rock. — Henry Rollins

One of Lindsay’s most famous bar brawls and the start of punk rock in the CKL happened on the same time at the same place on the same night. It was the late spring of 1980 and Lindsay’s first punk rock band, The Lindsay Huns, were playing at The Central Hotel on William Street — a long gone Lindsay landmark.

Musicologists will argue about the exact start of punk, and who started it, but punk rock had been around, and had been a growing musical and cultural movement since 1977, and probably earlier. The term itself — coined in the early 70s — was used by a few musical journalists to describe the style known as garage-rock.

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Council approves working group to research cultural centre for Kawartha Lakes  

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Deputy Mayor Doug Elmslie and roundtable discussions.
Deputy Mayor Doug Elmslie.

At the March 19 Committee of the Whole (COW) meeting, Council heard from Dianne Lister and Susan Taylor, representatives from the Kawartha Lakes Arts Council (KLAC) and the Cultural Centre Committee, who recommended that Council strike a working group to examine the possibility of a cultural centre for the municipality.

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KLAC wants to work with new council to advance tourism, development

in Community/The Arts by
L to R: Andy Letham, Brian Junkin, Gord James.

The Kawartha Lakes Arts Council and the Kawartha Lakes Heritage Network are looking forward to working with the new council to further strengthen cultural tourism and economic development in the municipality.

The groups were interested in electing candidates who support the cultural sector and who believe that long-term investment in the culture of the Kawartha Lakes is vital to economic and social growth.

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Dorothea Weise and the symphony of colour

in Community/Opinion/The Arts by
Dorothea Weise and the symphony of colour
Karl had always dreamed of moving to Canada. “It represented,” Dorothea tells me, “freedom, vast spaces, unspoiled nature.”

For close to 15 years Dorothea and her husband, Karl, lived two doors down from us. Quieter, more considerate neighbours you couldn’t find. And kind-hearted:  The feral marmalade cat we chased from our backyard invariably found a warm welcome at their back door.

We didn’t really get to know Dorothea or Karl. We did know that at some point they had emigrated from Germany, and that Karl had been a writer and that Dorothea was an accomplished and well-respected artist. We’d hear of shows she was mounting. At Art on Kent we saw some of her work and LCVI art teacher and Kawartha Arts Network co-founder Anders Widjedal told us how much he admired Dorothea for her adventurous spirit, the way she took artistic chances with her work.

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