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Ross Memorial will NOT amalgamate with Peterborough Regional Health Centre

in Around Town/Community/Health/Local News/Seniors by

The Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) board has accepted a Ross Memorial Hospital and Peterborough Regional Health Centre decision to not proceed with a proposal to amalgamate the two hospital sites.

“Having examined opportunities for integration over the past six months, the boards of both Ross Memorial Hospital (RMH) and Peterborough Regional Health Centre (PRHC) have mutually agreed that, at this time, they will not proceed with the proposal laid out in their June 2018 Directional Plan to integrate the two hospitals into one organization with two sites, a decision accepted by the Board of the Central East Local Health Integration Network (Central East LHIN) at the LHIN’s October 31st Board meeting.

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Ten clues that Lindsay is a car-first town

in Around Town/Columnists/Community/Health by
Ten clues that Lindsay is a car-first town
Both Fenelon Falls and Bobcaygeon now have bike share programs. Lindsay has none.

Lindsay has some well-loved trails that provide recreational opportunities for walkers and bicyclists. But when it comes to getting around town, cars — well, cars, pick-up trucks, SUVs, vans and motorcycles — rule.

While many Ontario communities are embracing pedestrian-first practices and creating infrastructure for cycling, the town of Lindsay remains car-centric, designed for and dominated by vehicles.

Not convinced?

Consider these 10 facts:

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Dorothea Weise and the symphony of colour

in Columnists/Community/The Arts by
Dorothea Weise and the symphony of colour
Karl had always dreamed of moving to Canada. “It represented,” Dorothea tells me, “freedom, vast spaces, unspoiled nature.”

For close to 15 years Dorothea and her husband, Karl, lived two doors down from us. Quieter, more considerate neighbours you couldn’t find. And kind-hearted:  The feral marmalade cat we chased from our backyard invariably found a warm welcome at their back door.

We didn’t really get to know Dorothea or Karl. We did know that at some point they had emigrated from Germany, and that Karl had been a writer and that Dorothea was an accomplished and well-respected artist. We’d hear of shows she was mounting. At Art on Kent we saw some of her work and LCVI art teacher and Kawartha Arts Network co-founder Anders Widjedal told us how much he admired Dorothea for her adventurous spirit, the way she took artistic chances with her work.

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Canada Post workers on strike for 24 hours; Union wants return of postal banks

in Around Town/Community/Local News/Poverty Reduction by
Postal banking was something Canada Post did decades earlier, ending the practice in 1968. Photo: Roderick Benns.

Scores of local postal workers walked off the job this morning in Lindsay and Bobcaygeon for 24 hours in a coordinated effort to draw attention to what has become a protracted strike. Calling for better health and safety conditions, gender equality, and a return to postal banking, Cheryl MacMillan, the president of the Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) Local 564, says workers are “overburdened.”

“Parcel delivery has exploded,” she tells the Advocate, with carriers often working 10-12 hour days to finish up their deliveries. While they are paid for this, it is a forced overtime and it’s taking its toll on workers’ health, she says.

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Lindsay law firm strong supporters of mental health in the workplace

in Around Town/Community/Health/Local News by
Jason Ward and Maria Francis of Wards Lawyers.

There are 17 people at Wards Lawyers in Lindsay and those numbers will soon swell to well over 20. It’s a growing staff, in what is already the second largest law firm in central Ontario. With so many people working in one of the top five most stressful occupations, Jason Ward knew they wanted to be leaders when it came to mental health supports in the workplace.

He and Karissa – who is both his wife and his business partner – created a full time position that is part administration but also Mental Health/First Aid Officer, a certified position through the Kawartha Pine Ridge District Health Unit.

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Legal Action on Basic Income ongoing, says lawyer Mike Perry

in Around Town/Community/Education/Health/Poverty Reduction by
Tracey Mechefske, Dana Bowman, Lawyer Mike Perry, Lindsay Advocate Publisher Roderick Benns, when the lawsuit was first announced. Photo: Trevor Hutchinson.

The legal action against the Ontario government for cancelling the basic income pilot project is continuing on track, according to Lindsay lawyer Mike Perry.

The legal action is proceeding on two fronts. The first is a request to the court to overturn the Minister’s decision to cancel the pilot project. Originally scheduled to be heard in October, the matter will now be heard in Ontario Superior Court (Divisional Court) in late January, 2019.

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McQuarrie Point at 25: A tribute to my grandparents

in Just in Time by
Marnie and Jim McQuarrie.

The sun sets over Lindsay as a young family gathers at the end of a rustic peninsula on the west bank of the Scugog River to admire a heron standing regally on the opposite shore. If they are lucky, they might perchance see a beaver swimming through the water.

To their left, in the shadows of a well-preserved remnant of the Carew sawmill complex (now part of the Rivermill Condominium community), a groundhog stealthily makes its way through the tall grass. In the distance, two ancient boathouses watch forlornly from the east bank as personal watercraft roar past.

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Dollars and sense: Three questions for the mayoral candidates

in Community/Local News by
Dollars and sense: Three questions for the mayoral candidates

We will not know before the upcoming municipal election, what, if anything, the provincial government plans to do with the levels of provincial funding it currently gives to municipalities.

There have been hints, one of the most telling, perhaps, found in comments made by a former Mike Harris cabinet minister, when he commented on current Finance Minister Vic Fedeli’s speech to the Toronto Economic Club on Sept. 11. Snobelen, in an article he wrote for The Sudbury Star described the speech as such: “It was left to the new finance minister, my old friend Vic Fedeli, to serve a bitter stew of fiscal realty.”

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Five reasons to support Tibetan dinner at the Armoury in Lindsay

in Around Town/Community/Local News by

All is set for Lindsay’s 15th annual Machik Dinner, an event that has introduced many to Tibetan food and culture and over the years raised $300,000 to support the educational work of an organization founded and led by a remarkable local family, the Rabgeys.

The dinner will be held at the Victoria Park Armoury on Saturday, October 13, with a bazaar and silent auction starting at 5 pm and the dinner itself at 6 pm.

In recent years roughly 200 have purchased the tickets. If you haven’t been among them, here are five reasons you might want to join in this year:

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The violin bowmaker and his mystery machine

in Around Town/Columnists/Community by
George MacArthur, professional bowmaker and inventor.

“I like high precision and ultimate control over mechanical things.” That’s George MacArthur speaking, and he’s not overstating.

George is a professional bowmaker, one of maybe 14 in Canada (his estimate). Some of his bows are in the capable hands of musicians such as Natalie MacMaster and the Leahy family.

From planks of Pernambuco snakewood and wamara — exotic species chosen for their high “Modulus of Elasticity” (inherent stiffness) and other qualities — George fashions violin sticks. The mathematically calculated tapers are precise to two thousandths of an inch. (That’s less than the thickness of a sheet of paper.) To the sticks he adds eyelets and screws custom machined from 01 tool steel and creates a hairing system.

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