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Lindsay

McQuarrie Point at 25: A tribute to my grandparents

in Just in Time by
Marnie and Jim McQuarrie.

The sun sets over Lindsay as a young family gathers at the end of a rustic peninsula on the west bank of the Scugog River to admire a heron standing regally on the opposite shore. If they are lucky, they might perchance see a beaver swimming through the water.

To their left, in the shadows of a well-preserved remnant of the Carew sawmill complex (now part of the Rivermill Condominium community), a groundhog stealthily makes its way through the tall grass. In the distance, two ancient boathouses watch forlornly from the east bank as personal watercraft roar past.

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Dollars and sense: Three questions for the mayoral candidates

in Community/Local News by
Dollars and sense: Three questions for the mayoral candidates

We will not know before the upcoming municipal election, what, if anything, the provincial government plans to do with the levels of provincial funding it currently gives to municipalities.

There have been hints, one of the most telling, perhaps, found in comments made by a former Mike Harris cabinet minister, when he commented on current Finance Minister Vic Fedeli’s speech to the Toronto Economic Club on Sept. 11. Snobelen, in an article he wrote for The Sudbury Star described the speech as such: “It was left to the new finance minister, my old friend Vic Fedeli, to serve a bitter stew of fiscal realty.”

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Five reasons to support Tibetan dinner at the Armoury in Lindsay

in Around Town/Community/Local News by

All is set for Lindsay’s 15th annual Machik Dinner, an event that has introduced many to Tibetan food and culture and over the years raised $300,000 to support the educational work of an organization founded and led by a remarkable local family, the Rabgeys.

The dinner will be held at the Victoria Park Armoury on Saturday, October 13, with a bazaar and silent auction starting at 5 pm and the dinner itself at 6 pm.

In recent years roughly 200 have purchased the tickets. If you haven’t been among them, here are five reasons you might want to join in this year:

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The violin bowmaker and his mystery machine

in Around Town/Columnists/Community by
George MacArthur, professional bowmaker and inventor.

“I like high precision and ultimate control over mechanical things.” That’s George MacArthur speaking, and he’s not overstating.

George is a professional bowmaker, one of maybe 14 in Canada (his estimate). Some of his bows are in the capable hands of musicians such as Natalie MacMaster and the Leahy family.

From planks of Pernambuco snakewood and wamara — exotic species chosen for their high “Modulus of Elasticity” (inherent stiffness) and other qualities — George fashions violin sticks. The mathematically calculated tapers are precise to two thousandths of an inch. (That’s less than the thickness of a sheet of paper.) To the sticks he adds eyelets and screws custom machined from 01 tool steel and creates a hairing system.

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Independent coffee shop has become vibrant community hub

in Business/Business Profiles/Columnists/Community by
Boiling Over is a big supporter of the arts community, with its open mic nights on the third Friday of each month. Photo: Roderick Benns.

On any given day it’s easy to see the City’s business getting done. No, we’re not at City Hall right now in your faithful scribe’s scenario. We are, in fact, at Boiling Over’s Coffee Vault in downtown Lindsay.

Meetings take place between City officials here. Economic Development might stop by for a tête-à-tête. Community groups meet to plan their activities. It’s not all business, of course. There’s socializing and debate, conversations and interviews. It’s a mix of millennials, Generation Z, Generation X, and Boomers. (Well, pretty much all ages.)

I’ve seen teachers lesson planning, students doing homework, and artists talking music.

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Back To School: Post-Secondary pursuits, past and present

in Education/Just in Time by
Trent University is one of a few popular post-secondary choices for local graduates.

A familiar ritual plays out across Kawartha Lakes on the first Tuesday of September. It’s a ritual that most of us have participated in – sometimes grudgingly, often anxiously. For those living in the countryside, this ritual involves waiting at the end of a long laneway for a yellow bus.

For those in town, it involves making a five, 10, 15, or 20-minute journey by foot, or occasionally by car. Parents reassure their children that they will do well on their first day of Kindergarten, while down the street their teen-aged counterparts are gaily exchanging pleasantries about their summer break, and comparing notes about who is taking what classes this semester.

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Intent to file class action lawsuit sparked in Lindsay over Basic Income cancellation

in Around Town/Community/Poverty Reduction by
From Left to Right: Tracey Mechefske, Dana Bowman, plaintiffs, Mike Perry, lawyer, Roderick Benns, publisher of the Advocate.

The fight for basic income has moved to the courts. An intent to file a class action lawsuit against the Province for its cancellation of the Ontario Basic Income Pilot has been filed by several parties in Lindsay.

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Joe Valas has been the ‘bee’s knees’ to customers for 60 years

in Business/Community/Environment/Seniors by
While loading a hive onto a pickup truck, it slipped and fell, cracking open on the pavement.

Joe Valas never intended to be a full-time beekeeper, but for 60 years, honey fans in the Kawartha Lakes have been glad he did just that.

After escaping Slovakia in 1952, Valas — a cabinetmaker trained to work with hand tools — moved to Southampton to find work. However, machinery had taken over furniture production in Canada, so he took temporary work on a farm and instead, found a field of clover.

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Four projects showcase Fleming as leader in environmental, natural sciences

in Around Town/Community/Environment by
Fleming continues to show leadership in environmental sciences. Photo: Marcy Adzich.

School’s not yet out at Fleming College’s Frost Campus where the summer semester is just now winding down for some students in Fish & Wildlife, Ecosystem Management, Forestry, and Heavy Equipment, and where environmental  projects have been on the go all summer.

Maybe because the campus is on the edge of town, what happens there often passes unnoticed. Too bad, because what happens is cutting-edge and inspiring environmental action.

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Planned hospital merger could be big risk for Ross Memorial

in Around Town/Community/Health/Seniors by
Planned hospital merger could be big risk for Ross Memorial

On November 20, 1902, medical experts travelled by train to Lindsay to be part of the opening of the $80,000 Ross Memorial Hospital, named in honour of the benefactor James L. Ross’ parents. At the time it was one of the finest and best-equipped hospitals in Canada.

A local paper commented that the day was “a red letter day in the history of the County of Victoria.” Ross, a successful railway engineer and philanthropist, had lived briefly in Lindsay and covered the entire cost of the hospital’s construction on the condition that “the County maintain the facility as it would not only be a memorial to his parents, but also a gift to the community he had once called home.”

County of Victoria Warden John Austin, in his remarks at the opening proclaimed, “the spirit which dedicated this building as a memorial of the past, and a blessing for the future, will outlive even its solid walls.”

After generations of local citizens have been born and died in what is surely a cornerstone of our community the questions we must answer now are: “will the hospital outlive the proposed merger with the Peterborough Regional Health Centre (PRHC), and if it does, in what form will it survive?”

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