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Lindsay

They were called in from the glen: Remembering our Great War nursing sisters

in Columnists/Community by
They were called in from the glen: Remembering our Great War nursing sisters

A stroll through Lindsay’s Riverside Cemetery is always a rewarding experience for the amateur historian, particularly when they happen upon the marker of a well-known local resident like Sir Sam Hughes (1853-1921), Canada’s controversial Minister of Militia and local Member of Parliament.

A few yards away lies the plot of the Hon. Leslie Frost (1895-1973), one-time Member of Provincial Parliament and Premier of Ontario. The Hughes monument is prominently placed on a hillock and is visible almost as soon as one enters the cemetery; Leslie Frost’s final resting place, meanwhile, is marked with a provincial heritage plaque.

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If Ontario Works, boutique tax credits go, Schmale on board with basic income

in Around Town/Community/Poverty Reduction by

Haliburton-Kawartha Lakes-Brock Conservative MP Jamie Schmale has clarified his position on basic income, saying he’s all for the pilot if Ontario Works is eliminated and the boutique tax credits go.

Schmale, who was not as specific in his first interview with The Lindsay Advocate, clarified his remarks on The Advocate’s active social media presence on Facebook.

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Senator Art Eggleton: Will Lindsay be the next Dauphin, Manitoba?

in Around Town/Community/Poverty Reduction by

One of Canada’s most well-known inequality fighters, Senator Art Eggleton, inspired members of the Ontario Basic Income Network recently who were in Lindsay for their annual general meeting.

In his opening remarks, Eggleton wondered aloud if Lindsay would become known as “the Dauphin, Manitoba of this decade.”

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Desire or pressure: What motivates us to get out of bed and work?

in Business/Columnists/Poverty Reduction by
Desire or pressure: What motivates us to get out of bed and work?
Can we have self-interest that is socially useful?

Three days ago, we ran a story called ‘Mariposa Dairy struggles to find young adults who want to work five days a week.’ At last count, more than 52,000 people had read it, a huge number for an online news magazine not even two months old.

Why did this story strike such a nerve?

Is it because the people who read it want to work there? Or did they know someone else who needed a job and so shared it with friends? Is it because they couldn’t believe it was true – that such a large percentage of younger people couldn’t handle, or didn’t want, full-time work?

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More ‘working poor’ in need of Lindsay’s homeless shelter

in Community/Poverty Reduction by
More ‘working poor’ in need of Lindsay’s homeless shelter
Lorrie Polito and Dave Tilley of A Place Called Home.

At Lindsay’s homeless shelter, more people are driving themselves to get there these days.

That’s not a good sign according to Lorrie Polito, the executive director of ‘A Place Called Home,’ Lindsay’s 19-bed shelter.

Having a car suggests some level of income from having a job. It’s a sign of the desperation of the so-called ‘working poor,’ those who are employed on some level but yet not making enough to get by.

“There’s not a lot of quality jobs left in Lindsay,” says Dave Tilley, operations manager at A Place Called Home.

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Return of the hall walkers

in Around Town/Seniors/Social Service Organizations by
Return of the hall walkers
Forget the cold; head for the halls.

Just because the changing seasons means that the weather can become challenging, local residents still have opportunities to take part in fitness programs that will help keep them healthy. The popular Walk in the Halls (Get WITH It!) program returns in November for a fifth year, and will be available free of charge twice weekly in Lindsay.

Walk in the Halls is a free, supervised, indoor walking program presented by the Community Care Health & Care Network and the City of Kawartha Lakes Family Health Team. The program is offered on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6-7 pm at Lindsay Collegiate Vocational Institute (LCVI) at 260 Kent St. W.

The program gives anyone interested in staying active during the winter months the chance to walk in a safe, warm setting. The sessions begin Nov. 7 and will run to the end of April (excluding school holidays).

The indoor walking program is an important element in giving local residents the chance for some low-impact exercise, says Jordan Prosper, health promoter with Community Care.

“Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in Canada, and walking is a beneficial way to stay active and can be done safely in the winter through the Get WITH It! program,” Jordan says.

“Our goal is to give the community a safe, warm and friendly place to walk during the winter months.”

The program has been well attended for the past four years. More than 450 different people have participated, walking more than 13,261,000 steps – the equivalent of walking from Lindsay to Calgary, Alberta and back.

No registration is required to participate. Walkers are asked to bring clean indoor walking shoes and to dress comfortably. Different routes through the school halls give people options for different distances and intensity. Supervisors are always on hand to assist or provide advice.

For further information about the Walk in the Halls program, contact Community Care Health Promoter Jordan Prosper at 705-324-7323 ext 301, or visit the Community Care website at www.ccckl.ca.

 

John A. Macdonald would have supported basic income

in Columnists/Poverty Reduction by
John A. Macdonald would have supported basic income

If there’s one thing Prime Minister John A. Macdonald could do exceptionally well, it was to recognize where the political winds were blowing. That’s not a criticism. The most able of politicians help move societies where they actually want to go anyway. Leaders and governments merely ensure a smooth transition, if they are doing their jobs well.

The fascinating rise of basic income policy in Canada — and the desperate need for it — is something our sage first leader would have seen coming.

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Fleming president says college tries to stay on top of skills employers need

in Business/Education by
Fleming president says college tries to stay on top of skills employers need
Fleming wants to address Lindsay's skills shortage.

One of the key challenges for Lindsay and Kawartha Lakes is the growing skills shortage. It’s affecting area employers who can’t find the right people, and of course it’s not good for the people who can’t find the right job.

Sir Sandford Fleming College President, Tony Tilly, is aware of the skills shortage phenomenon affecting Lindsay and other small towns that have seen their manufacturing base shrink.

“We’ve been aware of this issue for a number of years,” Tilly says, pointing out that the college system commissioned a report in 2010 entitled ‘People Without Jobs, Jobs Without People.’

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Do Millennials in Lindsay lack a good worth ethic?

in Business/Community by
Do Millennials in Lindsay lack a good worth ethic?
Do Millennials lack a solid work ethic?

“They seem to think highly of themselves.”

“Too over-confident.”

“They have a ‘baby-on-board’ protected mentality.”

“They’re always connected to their phones.”

The above was actual employer feedback from a large area employer about the young people sent to Victoria County Career Services (VCCS). It wasn’t the only business feedback.

Millennials also:

  • “Expect to move into the same job someone else has had for years.”
  • “They question everything.”
  • “They have less patience” for repetitive tasks, if the tasks aren’t meaningful.
  • “They have an expectation to be paid well.”
  • “They don’t like authoritarian style” of employers.
  • “They’re needy.”

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Home Hardware’s GM on keeping people, and being ‘people-people’

in Business by
Home Hardware’s GM on keeping people, and being ‘people people’

Most mornings, Frank Geerlinks swings through his favourite Tim Horton’s on his way to work in Lindsay from his home in the Little Britain area.

At the drive-through he is often greeted by a young woman who just “has it” in terms of customer service skills. One day very soon, he says, he will ask this young woman if she wants a job with him, at his family of Home Hardware stores.

He contrasts this with another incident, this time at a McDonald’s drive-through where he took his family through for a quick bite to eat. The employee was a young man who took his money and gave him his change without saying a single word to him.

Geerlinks couldn’t believe it.

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