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Large majority of people on basic income reported less anxiety, depression

OBIP Chronicles — Nearly 88 per cent of respondents to a survey about the Ontario Basis Income Pilot say the program helped lessen the stress and anxiety that came with not having enough income to meet their needs.

The survey also shows that nearly 73 per cent of respondents felt less depressed than they previously did, prior to being eligible for basic income.

In comments made in the survey, Jennifer remembers she finally felt like she was a part of society, not isolated from it.

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Basic Income at Christmas was making life a bit more worth living

in Community/Health/Local News/Poverty Reduction by

OBIP Chronicles — As we approach the holidays, many people who are receiving basic income are, for the first time in a long time, able to buy gifts for loved ones or can afford to do activities with their kids.

Giving is not only good for the soul, as the saying goes, but also one’s physical and emotional health. The evidence is unassailable.

  • In his book Why Good Things Happen to Good People, Stephen Post, a professor of preventative medicine at Stony Brook University in the U.S., reports that giving to others can enhance health benefits in people who are coping with a chronic illness.
  • In a 2006 study by Rachel Piferi of Johns Hopkins University and Kathleen Lawler of the University of Tennessee, giving was shown to even improve physical health and longevity because it decreases stress. People who provided social support to others had lower blood pressure than those in the study who didn’t, suggesting a direct physiological benefit to the power of giving.
  • Generosity is likely to be rewarded by others eventually, sometimes by the person you chose to give to, and sometimes by someone else. Several studies, including work by sociologists Brent Simpson and Robb Willer, have suggested that these exchanges promote a sense of trust and cooperation that strengthens our ties to others. In turn, these strengthened ties have been shown in research to spark positive social interactions, so imperative to good mental and physical health.

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Born to run: In memory of Lindsay’s Crazy Jim

in Around Town/Columnists/Community/Seniors by

This article originally ran in the July, 2018 magazine edition of The Lindsay Advocate. Jim Martin passed away Dec. 6., 2018.

My wife, Glenda, has run marathons. It’s a terrible spectator sport: at the starter’s pistol she would set her pace and return three hours later. The distance she was running was the distance from Lindsay to downtown Peterborough.

Frankly, I thought she was crazy. So when Glenda talks with awe about another runner and calls him crazy, I take notice.

That’s how she talks about Jim Martin, widely-known in the local running community as “Crazy Jim,” a long-time Lindsay resident and former ultramarathoner. When I first talked to Jim, 11 years ago, Jim had twice run all 11 ultramarathons in the annual Ontario Ultramarathon Series; another year he’d run all but one.

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Faithful giving at St. Thomas Aquinas

in Around Town/Community/Education/Poverty Reduction by
Students provided donations geared to the age of the children, as well as items for the family as a whole.

True to its commitment to not only providing education, but also to helping its students live out their faith, St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Secondary School in Lindsay has just wrapped up a campaign that saw the school community providing gifts for families in need.

As part of the school’s ‘Be an Angel’ program, the families were identified by St. Vincent de Paul, the Roman Catholic charity, and assigned to the school for some seasonal kindness.

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Almost half the money in the capital budget assigned to ‘roads and related’

in Around Town/Community by
It's all about the roads in this budget.

Over half of the proposed operating budget for the City of Kawartha Lakes is directed to public works and emergency services (29 per cent for each) and another 10 per cent goes to community services. However, almost half – 49 per cent — of the capital budget is to be assigned to “roads and related.”

Council’s first major task will be setting the 2019 budget. The process will culminate in approval of a finalized 2019 operating budget on February 20.

Today the first step for council was taken: Director of Corporate Services Jennifer Stover delivered a Powerpoint “primer” to prepare councillors for their slog through the 218 page Budget and Business Plan.

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The thrill of the festive hunt: Your guide to bazaar season

in Around Town/Community/Local News/Seniors by

Starting in mid-November, every weekend offers you the chance to pick up unique finds that are locally made, reasonably priced and usually support a great cause. That’s the beauty of Christmas bazaar season. Watch for signs outside churches, charities and nursing homes starting in mid-November.

Pro tip: Bring several of your own reusable containers for cookies and other baking, and cloth bags for larger purchases. And remember, like any other shopping expedition, it’s easy to get carried away—there are definitely better and worse choices.

Best bets

You’re looking for things you can’t get anywhere else, or that you can’t or won’t make yourself. Keep an eye out for:

-microwaveable rice- or bean-filled neck bags. These are often available at bazaars in much cheaper and more attractive versions than you’ll find in stores.

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Important new survey: The Ontario Basic Income Pilot chronicles

in Community/Health/Poverty Reduction by
After basic income, ‘rapid reinstatement’ back to previous program: Province

When the new Ontario government announced it was cancelling the basic income pilot, it threw many recipients into turmoil. It also dimmed hopes for research potential that had captured the interest of people across Canada and around the world.

Participants in the pilot and supporters of basic income are not going quietly away, however.

“Some recipients took the very courageous step of identifying themselves publicly in order for us all to better understand how much basic income was improving lives,” notes John Mills, a member of the Basic Income Canada Network (BICN) and the Ontario Basic Income Network (OBIN), who organized media training for some of these individuals in Hamilton.

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Local People’s Party of Canada movement continues to build

in Around Town/Community by
PPC Leader Maxime Bernier is packing halls across Canada as a Conservative alternative.

The local People’s Party of Canada Electoral District Association (EDA) will be meeting in Coboconk this weekend as it prepares to run a candidate in next year’s election in Haliburton-Kawartha Lakes-Brock (H-KL-B).

The People’s Party of Canada was formed on September 14, 2018 by Maxime Bernier, who had finished second in the Conservative Party of Canada (CPC) leadership. Bernier left the CPC over policy disagreements. He has been known over his years in politics as ‘the Albertan from Quebec’ and ‘Mad Max.’

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First council meeting goes to pot — and committee appointments

in Business/Community/Local News/Seniors by
Councillor Doug Elmslie and Councillor Emmett Yeo expressed the view that opting-in was the obvious decision.

A week after being sworn-in, City of Kawartha Lakes Council assembled around its custom-designed triangular conference table in the heart of the refurbished chambers. They gathered to hear a presentation on retail cannabis sales and to approve appointments to boards, committees and CHEST Fund disbursements.

Cannabis Retail Storefronts

By the Jan. 22 deadline set by the Province, council must make a decision on whether to opt-in or opt-out of having private recreational cannabis retail storefronts in Kawartha Lakes.

CAO Ron Taylor and Senior Licensing Officer Alix Scarr, provided a presentation that served as an overview of federal, provincial, and municipal responsibilities and powers with respect to cannabis and outlined the financial implications for the decision council will be making.

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Kinmount and Area Food Bank now open; seniors as clients on the rise in province

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The Kinmount and Area Food Bank will officially open to the public Dec. 13, serving 45 families.

According to Kinmount and Area Food Bank Chair Grace MacDonald, it will be open every other Thursday, based on a schedule that alternates with the Coboconk Food Bank and will “serve 45 families who were using either the Coboconk or Minden Food Bank,” says MacDonald.

MacDonald chairs a group of volunteers that have been working over the last year to open the much needed local resource. Finding local sponsors, a location that had a health board-certified kitchen and getting police checks completed were just some of the things that MacDonald and her committee had to accomplish in order to open. In the end the group decided on the Kinmount Baptist Church (4937 Monk Rd., Kinmount.)

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Protect yourself at holiday events

in Business/Columnists by

Welcome to December! The month where we start looking towards the approaching holidays, and planning for all the fun the season has to offer. Whether you are organizing a large company party, a small family get-together, or a charitable fundraiser of any size, part of your planning process should include a quick chat with your insurance broker (or us!) as there are a myriad of insurance options available to the Host of the event.

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