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Nesbitt’s Meat Market: Hayward’s hard work ethic reflects success of downtown business

The sign reads “Nesbitt’s Meat Market,” but though Jim Nesbitt still drops in for a chat on Saturday mornings, for the past 19 years it’s Adam Hayward who has owned and operated the business. And it was over 30 years ago that Hayward, at 13, began working part-time there as a ‘clean-up lad.’

Through high-school and as he completed a butchery program at George Brown College and business management at Humber, Hayward took on additional responsibilities and gained skills in cutting and grinding and running a business.

“Jim Nesbitt was a great mentor and friend who still helps me to this day,” says Hayward. Beyond the technical skills, the lessons that stayed with Hayward were to work hard, treat customers and employees with respect, and offer a quality product at a fair price.

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Christmas at the Ross: Dedication of front-line staff shines through

in Around Town/Community/Health/Local News by

Last year on Christmas Day, there were 152 patients in the Ross Memorial Hospital, including 35 in continuing care, 15 in rehabilitation, 12 in mental health, 88 in acute care and 2 newborns. And 17 people were admitted into the Ross on that day. As on most any other day at any hospital, there were heart-wrenching stories too: Sadly, two patients passed away that same day.

To care for all of these people and their visiting families, 189 people worked at the Ross last Christmas Day.

Think about that. That’s 189 families in our community whose Christmas’ have been changed or in some cases delayed so that another 152 families in our community can be cared for. And that number does not include volunteers — who donate their time and labour to make Christmas at the Ross a little brighter.

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The spirit of the season: What is it, and how do we make it last?

in Community by
What would happen if, as a reformed Scrooge promises, we kept Christmas in our hearts all the year?

Maybe you’re hearing it already. Maybe you’ve said it yourself. But what do we really mean when we say things like “getting into the Christmas spirit” or “the true spirit of the season”? What exactly is this thing that we all profess to desire not just now, but all year long?

Although it’s not precisely religious, it is something that transcends the ordinary, says Rev. Linda Park, lead minister at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church in Lindsay. “I think it’s a longing for a sense of generosity, a sense of family, a sense of community.”

When people use the phrase, what they’re identifying is “a spirit of giving, a spirit of feeling at one, of reaching out beyond themselves,” often mingled with nostalgia, suggests Rev. Craig Donnelly, minister at Cambridge Street United Church.

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Basic Income at Christmas was making life a bit more worth living

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OBIP Chronicles — As we approach the holidays, many people who are receiving basic income are, for the first time in a long time, able to buy gifts for loved ones or can afford to do activities with their kids.

Giving is not only good for the soul, as the saying goes, but also one’s physical and emotional health. The evidence is unassailable.

  • In his book Why Good Things Happen to Good People, Stephen Post, a professor of preventative medicine at Stony Brook University in the U.S., reports that giving to others can enhance health benefits in people who are coping with a chronic illness.
  • In a 2006 study by Rachel Piferi of Johns Hopkins University and Kathleen Lawler of the University of Tennessee, giving was shown to even improve physical health and longevity because it decreases stress. People who provided social support to others had lower blood pressure than those in the study who didn’t, suggesting a direct physiological benefit to the power of giving.
  • Generosity is likely to be rewarded by others eventually, sometimes by the person you chose to give to, and sometimes by someone else. Several studies, including work by sociologists Brent Simpson and Robb Willer, have suggested that these exchanges promote a sense of trust and cooperation that strengthens our ties to others. In turn, these strengthened ties have been shown in research to spark positive social interactions, so imperative to good mental and physical health.

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Large majority of people on basic income reported less anxiety, depression

in Community/Local News/Poverty Reduction by
“Basic income was the right thing to do for so many of us. I’m not lazy and never have been."

OBIP Chronicles — Nearly 88 per cent of respondents to a survey about the Ontario Basis Income Pilot say the program helped lessen the stress and anxiety that came with not having enough income to meet their needs.

The survey also shows that nearly 73 per cent of respondents felt less depressed than they previously did, prior to being eligible for basic income.

In comments made in the survey, Jennifer remembers she finally felt like she was a part of society, not isolated from it.

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Born to run: In memory of Lindsay’s Crazy Jim

in Around Town/Columnists/Community/Seniors by

This article originally ran in the July, 2018 magazine edition of The Lindsay Advocate. Jim Martin passed away Dec. 6., 2018.

My wife, Glenda, has run marathons. It’s a terrible spectator sport: at the starter’s pistol she would set her pace and return three hours later. The distance she was running was the distance from Lindsay to downtown Peterborough.

Frankly, I thought she was crazy. So when Glenda talks with awe about another runner and calls him crazy, I take notice.

That’s how she talks about Jim Martin, widely-known in the local running community as “Crazy Jim,” a long-time Lindsay resident and former ultramarathoner. When I first talked to Jim, 11 years ago, Jim had twice run all 11 ultramarathons in the annual Ontario Ultramarathon Series; another year he’d run all but one.

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Faithful giving at St. Thomas Aquinas

in Around Town/Community/Education/Poverty Reduction by
Students provided donations geared to the age of the children, as well as items for the family as a whole.

True to its commitment to not only providing education, but also to helping its students live out their faith, St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Secondary School in Lindsay has just wrapped up a campaign that saw the school community providing gifts for families in need.

As part of the school’s ‘Be an Angel’ program, the families were identified by St. Vincent de Paul, the Roman Catholic charity, and assigned to the school for some seasonal kindness.

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Almost half the money in the capital budget assigned to ‘roads and related’

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It's all about the roads in this budget.

Over half of the proposed operating budget for the City of Kawartha Lakes is directed to public works and emergency services (29 per cent for each) and another 10 per cent goes to community services. However, almost half – 49 per cent — of the capital budget is to be assigned to “roads and related.”

Council’s first major task will be setting the 2019 budget. The process will culminate in approval of a finalized 2019 operating budget on February 20.

Today the first step for council was taken: Director of Corporate Services Jennifer Stover delivered a Powerpoint “primer” to prepare councillors for their slog through the 218 page Budget and Business Plan.

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The thrill of the festive hunt: Your guide to bazaar season

in Around Town/Community/Local News/Seniors by

Starting in mid-November, every weekend offers you the chance to pick up unique finds that are locally made, reasonably priced and usually support a great cause. That’s the beauty of Christmas bazaar season. Watch for signs outside churches, charities and nursing homes starting in mid-November.

Pro tip: Bring several of your own reusable containers for cookies and other baking, and cloth bags for larger purchases. And remember, like any other shopping expedition, it’s easy to get carried away—there are definitely better and worse choices.

Best bets

You’re looking for things you can’t get anywhere else, or that you can’t or won’t make yourself. Keep an eye out for:

-microwaveable rice- or bean-filled neck bags. These are often available at bazaars in much cheaper and more attractive versions than you’ll find in stores.

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Important new survey: The Ontario Basic Income Pilot chronicles

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After basic income, ‘rapid reinstatement’ back to previous program: Province

When the new Ontario government announced it was cancelling the basic income pilot, it threw many recipients into turmoil. It also dimmed hopes for research potential that had captured the interest of people across Canada and around the world.

Participants in the pilot and supporters of basic income are not going quietly away, however.

“Some recipients took the very courageous step of identifying themselves publicly in order for us all to better understand how much basic income was improving lives,” notes John Mills, a member of the Basic Income Canada Network (BICN) and the Ontario Basic Income Network (OBIN), who organized media training for some of these individuals in Hamilton.

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Local People’s Party of Canada movement continues to build

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PPC Leader Maxime Bernier is packing halls across Canada as a Conservative alternative.

The local People’s Party of Canada Electoral District Association (EDA) will be meeting in Coboconk this weekend as it prepares to run a candidate in next year’s election in Haliburton-Kawartha Lakes-Brock (H-KL-B).

The People’s Party of Canada was formed on September 14, 2018 by Maxime Bernier, who had finished second in the Conservative Party of Canada (CPC) leadership. Bernier left the CPC over policy disagreements. He has been known over his years in politics as ‘the Albertan from Quebec’ and ‘Mad Max.’

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