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Born to run: In memory of Lindsay’s Crazy Jim

in Around Town/Community/Opinion/Seniors by

This article originally ran in the July, 2018 magazine edition of The Lindsay Advocate. Jim Martin passed away Dec. 6., 2018.

My wife, Glenda, has run marathons. It’s a terrible spectator sport: at the starter’s pistol she would set her pace and return three hours later. The distance she was running was the distance from Lindsay to downtown Peterborough.

Frankly, I thought she was crazy. So when Glenda talks with awe about another runner and calls him crazy, I take notice.

That’s how she talks about Jim Martin, widely-known in the local running community as “Crazy Jim,” a long-time Lindsay resident and former ultramarathoner. When I first talked to Jim, 11 years ago, Jim had twice run all 11 ultramarathons in the annual Ontario Ultramarathon Series; another year he’d run all but one.

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Protect yourself at holiday events

in Business/Opinion by

Welcome to December! The month where we start looking towards the approaching holidays, and planning for all the fun the season has to offer. Whether you are organizing a large company party, a small family get-together, or a charitable fundraiser of any size, part of your planning process should include a quick chat with your insurance broker (or us!) as there are a myriad of insurance options available to the Host of the event.

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Ensuring mental health throughout the holidays

in Community/Health/Opinion by
Lindsay basic income pilot: Mental health, resilience will surely improve

It’s the most wonderful time of the year. The thermostat slowly drops, snow starts to fall and people are bundling up. Wrapped in their favourite scarves, mittens and toques, people are venturing out into the brisk Canadian winter to take on the day.

Plans are being made for dinners and parties; children are scribbling down hand-written lists with hopes of receiving that one perfect gift. For many, the start of the holiday season means feelings of joy, hope and warmth. For others, it can be a completely different experience.

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Volunteering a good job search activity

in Community/Opinion by

With the holidays approaching thoughts turn to giving and spending time with loved ones.  You might think about donating some time to a worthy cause.

But did you know that volunteering is also a good job search activity?

Volunteering is a great way to add current experience to your resume or show your commitment to the community.  There are lots of charities and non-profit agencies in our community looking for extra help, not only this time of year but all year round.

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I’m dreaming of a green Christmas

in Community/Opinion by
Christmas has become associated with the pressures of finding “the perfect gift,” and the anxiety that comes with spending more money than we have.

It is surely ironic that Christmas, the celebration of a child born to a homeless couple, has become one of the biggest consumer festivals of our culture. As a result Christmas has become associated with the pressures of finding “the perfect gift,” and the anxiety that comes with spending more money than we have. And, of course, there is the strain that all the “stuff” that comes with the season puts on our already fragile earth.

So what are a few things that we can do to make Christmas a time of generosity and love not just for each other, but for the earth? Here are a few suggestions.

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The active transportation alternative: 10 great benefits

in Community/Health/Opinion by

So, if we can agree that, as argued in an earlier column, Lindsay is a car-first community, what would be the benefits to us as individuals and as a community of giving pedestrians and cyclists priority — of promoting “active transportation?”

Here are 10 benefits to consider, beginning with health and the environment then moving on to economic and social benefits (the four areas covered by City of Kawartha Lakes Director of Development Services Chris Marshall in a presentation to Council on active transportation– which you can access here).

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Ten clues that Lindsay is a car-first town

in Around Town/Community/Health/Opinion by
Ten clues that Lindsay is a car-first town
Both Fenelon Falls and Bobcaygeon now have bike share programs. Lindsay has none.

Lindsay has some well-loved trails that provide recreational opportunities for walkers and bicyclists. But when it comes to getting around town, cars — well, cars, pick-up trucks, SUVs, vans and motorcycles — rule.

While many Ontario communities are embracing pedestrian-first practices and creating infrastructure for cycling, the town of Lindsay remains car-centric, designed for and dominated by vehicles.

Not convinced?

Consider these 10 facts:

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The Great War’s legacy in Kawartha Lakes

in Just in Time/Opinion by
I think of the station platforms in the various towns and villages across the county, from where soldiers bid farewell to loved ones on route to war.

At the eleventh hour of the eleventh day in the eleventh month of the year, Canadians from coast to coast will pause for two minutes’ silence to remember those who died during the First and Second World Wars; the Korean conflict; and various peacekeeping operations in which Her Majesty’s armoured, naval, and air forces have been involved over the course of the 20th and 21st Centuries.

The statistics are staggering: nearly 70,000 Canadians died during the First World War (1914-1918); nearly 50,000 gave their lives during the Second World War (1939-1945); 516 died during the Korean War; and over 1,800 have paid the supreme sacrifice in various operations at home and abroad over the course of the last 70 years.

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Dorothea Weise and the symphony of colour

in Community/Opinion/The Arts by
Dorothea Weise and the symphony of colour
Karl had always dreamed of moving to Canada. “It represented,” Dorothea tells me, “freedom, vast spaces, unspoiled nature.”

For close to 15 years Dorothea and her husband, Karl, lived two doors down from us. Quieter, more considerate neighbours you couldn’t find. And kind-hearted:  The feral marmalade cat we chased from our backyard invariably found a warm welcome at their back door.

We didn’t really get to know Dorothea or Karl. We did know that at some point they had emigrated from Germany, and that Karl had been a writer and that Dorothea was an accomplished and well-respected artist. We’d hear of shows she was mounting. At Art on Kent we saw some of her work and LCVI art teacher and Kawartha Arts Network co-founder Anders Widjedal told us how much he admired Dorothea for her adventurous spirit, the way she took artistic chances with her work.

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The case for a living wage — a social contract and moral imperative

in Community/Opinion/Poverty Reduction by

This is Living Wage Week, part of a campaign to encourage employers to pay a wage that is significantly higher than the legal minimum. Recently I highlighted the negative impact of inequality. One of the ways to increase equality is through reducing income difference before tax by increasing minimum wages or through a ‘living wage.’

Recently, the provincial government announced that the minimum wage would remain at $14 for the next two years. While expected, this announcement is not good news for the people working at jobs that typically pay a minimum wage; jobs in the retail, food services, and hospitality sectors.

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