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A View from Parliament Hill: A summary of the COVID-19 emergency response act

in Federal/Health by

The House of Commons began debate early this morning on the federal government’s response to the economic and social upheaval caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The COVID-19 Emergency Response Act was presented to parliament after a marathon of last-minute negotiations among the major political parties and outlines the framework that will be used by government to spend the proposed $107 billion to assist individuals, small businesses, along with the nation’s housing, banking and financial sectors.

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Local businesses work around downtown reconstruction

in Community/Municipal by
“We would love people to take the steps to come see us.” Photo: Sienna Frost.

The Enbridge natural gas pipeline replacement project is moving along as planned, with crews completing work along Kent Street, from Lindsay Street North to William Street, and continuing towards Victoria Avenue.

It’s not easy for local businesses in the downtown that are affected but most owners are taking it in stride.

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Flower power: A dark and early drive with Sarah Hill

in Community by
Hill’s is not just a family business but a multi-generational family business. Photo: Jamie Morris.

It’s 3:30 a.m. when the Hill’s Florist & Greenhouses van pulls up. Eleven years ago I climbed into the same Ford Econoline to accompany Roger Hill on his weekly trek to “The Clock” — the Mississauga flower auctions.

There’s a different Hill at the wheel this time: Sarah, Roger’s daughter, who for the past few years has been the one occupying the Hill’s seat in the auction gallery.

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Employee retention challenges? This event is for you

in Business by
Employee retention challenges? This event is for you

Local business peers are coming together to discuss the challenges employers face in the hiring and retention of an employee, a must-attend event for local employers.

Hosted by Kawartha Lakes Small Business and Entrepreneurship Centre and Strike Point Bowling in Lindsay, the event will be held at Strike Point and feature a panel discussion, speakers, good food and a fun break.

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British Empire Fuels a local business success story since 1940 

in Sponsored Content by
Sheila Whyte, Rob Whyte, and Greg Whyte of British Empire Fuels.

As the Second World War gripped much of the world, the Ewell family left England in 1940 for a calmer life in Canada, likely content to know they were still part of the vast British Empire.

Fitting then that they would use the empire’s still formidable prestige to name their brand new company – British Empire Coal Supply Company, located in Toronto.

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Improvements coming to Doube’s Trestle Bridge

in Community/Environment by
Improvements coming to Doube’s Trestle Bridge

Trail improvements to the historic Doube’s Trestle Bridge are commencing mid September and could take
two months. The cost is in excess of $100,000. Worn wood decking is being replaced with environmentally friendly composite lumber to permit safer passage and provide a longer lifespan.

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Our shared destiny: Understanding life in small towns

in Opinion by
Lindsay at dawn. Photo: Michael LaRiviere.

People who reside in small towns, much more than in large cities, have a shared destiny.

We are not lost in the shuffle of faceless people and endless possibilities. We are each others’ possibilities; we are each other’s best chance.

The ache of a factory or business closing is felt not only by the people who work there, their lives scarred by uncertain days ahead, but by everyone in the town. That includes our small businesses who may then not see as much support. It could include your neighbour or a family member whose life has irrevocably changed.

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Ready, set, grow: The challenge and promise of a bigger, better Kawartha Lakes

in Community/Municipal by
Thousands of people are coming. Will we be ready?

Speak to any four people in the City of Kawartha Lakes about the prospect of growth and development and you are likely to get at least as many opinions.

Some will no doubt abhor the idea of more people, more traffic and less of the tranquility that they either grew up with or came here to enjoy. A business owner might say we need to grow and we need to grow fast to increase economic opportunity and wonder how we can increase employment. A parent with young children might suggest that we are growing too old as a community and ask about much-needed community amenities.

Still others might simply ask, ‘‘When is the Walmart coming?”

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Passion Projects: Rustically Signed

in Business/Community by
L to R: Holly and Stephanie. Photo: Mallory Cramp-Waldinsperger.

This story is part of an ongoing series exploring local makers-turned-entrepreneurs in Kawartha Lakes to find out what motivates them.

Stephanie Buckley and Holly Suddick are the two-woman team behind Rustically Signed, a local business providing custom décor and woodworking classes in Lindsay.

After Suddick’s sign-making business grew rapidly, she began to have a hard time keeping up with custom orders. “I was starting to have to tell people ‘no’… so then I reached out to Steph and asked if I could send some of my customers her way,” she says.

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Western boots and a big heart help define this Kicking Cowgirl

in Around Town/Business/Community/Poverty Reduction by
Western boots and a big heart help define this Kicking Cowgirl
Kimberly Dawn, of the award-winning Kicking Cowgirl Designs western boutique in Bobcaygeon.

It’s a long way from Modesto, California to Bobcaygeon – particularly with stops in Toronto, Nairobi, Kenya, and Gulu, Uganda – but for the owner of the award-winning Kicking Cowgirl Designs western boutique, the journey has been a summation of her skills, passions, and vocation.

Kimberly Dawn had come to the family cottage in Buckhorn since her youth, but made a permanent move to the Kawarthas four years ago. Prior to that she called Toronto home, operating her western boutique from a storefront in a section of her parents’ silk screening shop. Similar to the present store in Bobcaygeon, her 416 location sold western wear ranging from boots, to belts, to hats, to clothing, but the entire business originated from screened t-shirts she sold as a fund-raiser years earlier.

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