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Mental Health

What is collaborative family law?

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What is collaborative family law?
In the collaborative process, lawyers are specially trained to remain focused on settlement.

Collaborative family law has grown in popularity over the last 25 years and has been embraced by family law practitioners to varying degrees. The collaborative family law movement began in the Western American states and was later adopted in British Columbia as one of the first provinces in Canada to embrace a shift in family law towards alternative forms of dispute resolution. Since that time, many lawyers across the country have embraced a transition to the collaborative process, perhaps in light of the fact that most family law cases settle before they reach the adjudication phase of litigation.

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Powerless guards mired in poor working conditions at Lindsay’s Super Jail

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Powerless guards mired in poor working conditions at Lindsay’s Super Jail
“They are broken. Mentally broken. Some are suicidal, from a career in corrections.”

For the past couple months the Lindsay Advocate has been speaking to employees and former employees of Lindsay’s Central East Correctional Centre. Citing concern for their jobs (and privacy issues) all interviewees requested anonymity. We also spoke on the record to representatives of the union and to Ontario’s Solicitor General.

“We call them broken toys.”

“They are broken. Mentally broken. Some are suicidal, from a career in corrections,” says one retired correctional officer (CO), describing some of his former co-workers.

As an outsider with no experience with the prison system, I had of course expected stories from COs involving mental health. But I thought I would hear stories of trauma that come with having a job that involves providing custody and control for criminals (or those suspected of criminality): the ‘crazy stories’ of fights, drugs, rape and murder. What shocked me was that the more I spoke to COs (current and retired) the more I learned that the stress these people described was more often about policy, procedure and management then it was about the salacious things I had imagined.

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How I’ll be voting in this federal election

in Opinion by
How I’ll be voting in this federal election

Like millions of other Canadians this month, I’ll be voting for a local candidate to represent my interests in Parliament.

If I lived in 1950s or 1960s Canada, my choice might be different than it will be this month. Back then, the business world worked closely with governments to help co-construct a society worth living in for each of us. ‘Open for business’ back then actually meant something because big business was a reliable partner that paid a living wage to its employees.

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Housing and mental health supported by CKL-Trent University partnership

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Housing and mental health supported by CKL-Trent University partnership

Over the past three years, Trent University and the municipality of Kawartha Lakes have partnered to create an Intensive Case Management Evaluation Report for Kawartha Lakes. Intensive Case Management (ICM) is an approach to supporting clients with complex needs in terms of housing and mental health. The Evaluation Report found that the ICM program results in better quality of life for clients, more sustainable service delivery and increased satisfaction in housing.

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Game on! Wards Lawyers Kids’ Road Hockey Tournament might be Canada’s biggest

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This just might be the nation’s largest kids’ road hockey tournament.

What could be more Canadian than a road hockey game? Well, how about a tournament with no fewer than 12 road hockey rinks and games running all day?

The Wards Lawyers Kids’ Road Hockey Tournament in support of youth mental health is set for Sunday, May 26. According to lawyer and organizer Jason Ward it will probably be the nation’s largest kids’ road hockey tournament.

All that will be missing when it gets underway at 8 am will be game-pausing cries of “Car!” (Kent Street, from Cambridge to York, will be closed to traffic for the event.)

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Child and youth mental health issues impact entire family

in Health by

The mental health of a young person is equally important as their physical health. This reality can be lost in a world of competing demands on our health care system. The statistics suggest that one in five children and youth in Ontario will experience an issue related to their mental health and that five out of six (almost 85 per cent) will not receive the treatment they need for various reasons.

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Mental health training is available to all of us

in Health/Opinion by

The desire to help and the hope that we can provide direction, care, or support to someone that may be struggling is inherent in many of us. Whether it is a family member, friend, or even a neighbour, when we see a loved one experiencing mental distress most of us are genuinely inclined to help.

Quite often two things keep us from offering that support: We are either 1) Not sure what we’re supposed to do or 2) We’re afraid if we do something, we’re going to end up worsening the situation.

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Ford government fails people on disability in move from BI to ODSP; pharmacists step in

in Community/Poverty Reduction by
Pharmacists like Cathy Puffer at Remedy'sRx have stepped in to help. Photo: Sienna Frost.

A local social worker is sounding the alarm over the transition for people who were collecting basic income and then returned to ODSP, which left some people on disability with a gap in medication coverage.

Karla Forgaard-Pullen, a social worker based in Lindsay, says that some of the basic income recipients who were previously on ODSP (Ontario Disability Support Program) are on a backlogged list waiting for their return to the program to be green lit. The basic income program issued its last payment in March.

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Robertson retires after nearly 29 years at helm of Boys and Girls Club

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Scott Robertson is retiring from the Boys and Girls Club. Photo: Erin Smith.

Roderick Benns recently interviewed Scott Robertson, executive director of the Boys and Girls Club of Kawartha Lakes. As he gets set to retire later this month after nearly 30 years at the helm, we asked him a few questions about the changes he has seen and the kids’ lives he has watched unfold over many years.

Benns: What are some key ways the Club has changed over 30 years in terms of what your organization is all about? How has the core mission evolved?

Robertson: Our mission really hasn’t changed. Today we operate under the Mission and core Values of Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada. Even though we weren’t a Boys and Girls Club in the beginning, the Club was founded on beliefs that were very compatible.

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Ensuring mental health throughout the holidays

in Community/Health/Opinion by
Lindsay basic income pilot: Mental health, resilience will surely improve

It’s the most wonderful time of the year. The thermostat slowly drops, snow starts to fall and people are bundling up. Wrapped in their favourite scarves, mittens and toques, people are venturing out into the brisk Canadian winter to take on the day.

Plans are being made for dinners and parties; children are scribbling down hand-written lists with hopes of receiving that one perfect gift. For many, the start of the holiday season means feelings of joy, hope and warmth. For others, it can be a completely different experience.

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