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Tents and trailers: A history of camping in Kawartha Lakes

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Tents and trailers: A history of camping in Kawartha Lakes

Twilight falls over a nearby lake as you stand at the foot of the picnic table and scrape the remnants of Hamburger Helper into a garbage bag. Hamburger Helper again? For the third night in a row? Why, of course — and scalloped potatoes from a box, too. You finish scraping the dishes and pile them into a tub of hot water.

The water was boiled in a dented kettle over the same Coleman stove you have brought on every summer vacation since, well, since … it doesn’t really matter. It’s been around for as long as you can remember. You have, after all, been doing this thing called camping since you were very young.

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Cycling through time: A few moments in Fleetwood

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At St. Mary’s and Fleetwood Roads is the former Fleetwood School. Built in 1876–77, this red brick house has been a private home since 1967. Photo: Ian McKechnie.

In July’s issue of The Lindsay Advocate, associate editor Nancy Payne took a road trip to the “most sparsely populated part of Kawartha Lakes,” while contributing writer Jamie Morris travelled to Fenelon Falls via electric bicycle.

Thinking their thoughts after them, I elected to combine two passions of mine — cycling and exploring — and set out on my trusty Opus Porto bike at 10:03 a.m. on a Saturday in late June with a large bottle of water, two cans of Canada Dry ginger ale, a peanut butter sandwich on raisin bread, some slices of leftover pizza, and a large Granny Smith apple. Oh, and plenty of sunscreen, too.

It’s a long way to Fleetwood, after all.

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Mackey Funeral Home buys Stoddart Funeral Home

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Mackey Funeral Home buys Stoddart Funeral Home
Mackey Funeral Home has purchased Stoddart's Funeral Home. Photo: Jennifer Boksman.

Linden Mackey, owner of the century-old Mackey Funeral Home in Lindsay has bought out Stoddart Funeral Home, Lindsay’s other venerable funeral institution.

Shain Fletcher, the sole owner of Stoddart, quietly sold his shares of the funeral home to Mackey this spring, after discussions of keeping the funeral home locally owned and operated.

The Mackey and Stoddart families had long cooperated throughout the years, with Fletcher even training at one time under James Mackey and the late Linden and Gordon Mackey, according to the Stoddart website.

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Remembering the polio epidemic of 1951

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Medical equipment for polio patients included the famous “iron lung.”

In the late summer of 1951, a young man named Harold Mitchell journeyed to the Canadian National Exhibition with some friends.

To a lad from Wilberforce, a trip to Toronto’s annual extravaganza would have been quite an outing – what with all of its colourful midway rides, mouth-watering aromas wafting from hamburger stands, and awe-inspiring entertainers offering quite the contrast to the quieter environs of rural Haliburton County.

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The rise and fall of bakeries and home baking in Kawartha Lakes

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Bill Gill, whose father Herb ran a bakery in Bobcaygeon.

The wonderful aroma of freshly baked bread wafts from the inner sanctum of A.B. Terry’s bakery, confectionery, and restaurant at 117 Kent Street in downtown Lindsay.

The loaves emerging from Terry’s state-of-the art ovens represent only one of the many offerings found in this hunger-inducing establishment — it’s the middle of June, after all, and the wedding season is fast approaching. Anyone getting married in this year of 1901 will want to select one of the stylish wedding cakes which have made Terry famous far and wide across Victoria County.

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The latest on the flu: A snapshot of the 1918 outbreak

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The latest on the flu: A snapshot of the 1918 outbreak

On November 1, 1918, five women boarded a train in Lindsay bound for Oshawa. Etta Graham, Aileen Hughes and Elsie Sutcliffe were members of the Voluntary Aid Detachment (VAD), a corps of nursing aides organized by the Canadian Red Cross and the St. John Ambulance.

The VAD was instrumental in saving lives during the First World War, and the sight of a big red cross emblazoned across the side of an ambulance piloted by VAD personnel had become one of the most famous symbols of health care during that conflict and during the subsequent flu outbreak — much as the N95 face mask has in 2020.  Keep Reading

‘A Great Event:’ The Lindsay winter carnival of 1912-1917

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'A Great Event:' The Lindsay winter carnival of 1912-1917
Entrants line up for a cutter race in downtown Lindsay. Photo courtesy of Kawartha Lakes Public Library.

It’s the middle of winter in Lindsay, circa 1912. A fresh blanket of snow covers the ground, glistening like freshly-ground glass whenever the sun avails itself of an opportunity to peek through the clouds. A few cutters drift by, the jingling bells on the horses bringing some much-needed merriment to the cold, bleak surroundings. A distinguished-looking gentleman mutters an audible oath as he takes a spill on some black ice — leaving his new coat covered in dirt and snow, and leaving a passing group of churchgoing women aghast at his equally filthy choice of language.

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Burial customs, past and present: ‘How they so softly rest’

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'How They So Softly Rest:' Burial customs, past and present
Riverside Cemetery, Lindsay. Photo: Ian McKechnie.

In 1991, the remains of an Indigenous man which had been unearthed in a Peterborough parking lot some three decades earlier were re-interred in the Curve Lake Cemetery. The actual interment was preceded by a Feast of the Living, with a sweet grass and sage smudge performed by four pipe carriers, and food prepared to accompany the deceased to the land of spirits. The following day, more smudging, honour songs, and offerings of tobacco accompanied the reburial of these 2,000 year-old remains. For the First Peoples, this Indigenous man was now on his way to meet his ancestors, as per their burial customs.

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Lindsay’s last hanging: The McGaughey case of 1924

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Lindsay's last hanging: The McGaughey case of 1924
Fred McGaughey, age 32, will hang by the neck until dead in the gaol’s courtyard.

It’s May 25, 1924, and the evening is drawing nigh. You are a senior student at S.S. No. 6 Ops Township, known to locals as “McArthur’s School,” and you have just had supper at Joseph Parrington’s place, down on what is now called Halter Road. You’ve been helping Mr. Parrington with chores since school began, and he has graciously invited you to eat with his family on this calm Sunday night.

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