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homelessness

More children than adults at A Place Called Home this Christmas

in Community/Poverty Reduction by
APCH Board Chair Karen Round.

The sound of children’s voices during the holidays typically conjures feelings of warmth and sentimentality – unless, of course, those voices are in a homeless shelter.

It’s a jarring mental image but one that A Place Called Home in Lindsay is being forced to contemplate.

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From homelessness in Toronto to housing in Lindsay

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From homelessness in Toronto to housing in Lindsay

Canada is in the grip of an affordable housing crisis. Large municipalities like Toronto are especially hard hit with primary vacancy rates as low as 1.1%. The average cost of a one bedroom apartment has nearly doubled from $1,400 a month in 2009 to $2,400 in 2019. Many working class Torontonians are paying 60% or more of their incomes on rent — and homelessness is becoming more common as a result.

Low income people like me are even more adversely affected by the affordable housing crisis than working class people are.

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Housing and mental health supported by CKL-Trent University partnership

in Municipal by
Housing and mental health supported by CKL-Trent University partnership

Over the past three years, Trent University and the municipality of Kawartha Lakes have partnered to create an Intensive Case Management Evaluation Report for Kawartha Lakes. Intensive Case Management (ICM) is an approach to supporting clients with complex needs in terms of housing and mental health. The Evaluation Report found that the ICM program results in better quality of life for clients, more sustainable service delivery and increased satisfaction in housing.

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Chronic homelessness dramatically reduced in Kawartha Lakes, Haliburton

in Community/Municipal/Poverty Reduction by
Kawartha Lakes, Haliburton, reduce chronic homelessness dramatically

The Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness has announced that the City of Kawartha Lakes and the County of Haliburton have marked a 51 per cent reduction in chronic homelessness since August 2018. Currently, Kawartha Lakes-Haliburton are one of the two communities “in the last mile” and are being recognized at the ‘Built for Zero’ press conference in Toronto for showing that they are projected to reach “functional zero” on chronic homelessness within the next 12 months or less.

“Functional zero” means that the City and County will have three or less people experiencing chronic homelessness over three consecutive months. Chronic homelessness is when an individual has been experiencing homelessness for six months within the last year.

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The economics of homelessness as basic income pilot winds down

in Community/Poverty Reduction by

Seventy-six years ago, an American psychologist named Abraham Maslow emphasized the process of growing and developing as a person in order to achieve one’s potential.

He called this process a ‘hierarchy of needs’ and, in a testament to common sense, said nothing was more important than basic physical requirements like food, water, sleep, and warmth, as well as safety and security.

Typically, most of us find these things in the security of our income and in the security of own home. When we can’t manage to secure these most basic of needs, though, we’re certainly not going to be able to grow any further as individuals, let alone make a contribution to society. In fact, we will become part of the pressure on our society’s health care system, on our social services, and on our policing and judicial systems.

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Housing and homelessness plan review, update and survey

in Community/Local News/Poverty Reduction by

Provincial legislation has established the City responsible for the administration of housing and homelessness programs and services for both the City of Kawartha Lakes and the County of Haliburton. In this capacity, the City is called the Service Manager. The province requires Service Managers to develop a 10-year Housing and Homelessness Plan (“the Plan”). The Plan establishes priorities for housing and homelessness services based on targeted consultations and research.

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Kawartha Lakes Cycling Classic: Annual ride for A Place Called Home

in Around Town/Community/Health/Poverty Reduction by

The annual Kawartha Lakes Cycling Classic returns Aug. 25 to Lindsay, as riders from across the region ride for A Place Called Home (APCH).

This year’s event promises to be bigger than ever. With courses of varying intensities, (13, 25, 50, 100, and 160 kilometres) the event offers both veteran and novice, casual and competitive cyclists a chance to ride for a great cause in the local community.

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Kawartha Lakes/Haliburton more than double homelessness housing goal

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City of Kawartha Lakes/Haliburton more than double homelessness housing goal

The City of Kawartha Lakes and Haliburton County Council made a commitment as part of the 20,000 Homes Campaign to house 24 of the most vulnerable homeless in our area by July 1, 2018.

To date, 52 individuals (of the 136 individuals identified as homeless) have been housed in the community and are no longer experiencing homelessness.

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Governments should give money without conditions to create a better society

in Community/Opinion/Poverty Reduction by
As an experiment, a group of 13 chronically homeless men in London, England were given cash with no strings attached.

I live a good life and I try not to take it for granted. Because I have a certain income, I can choose what to buy and where to shop. I can generate options and choose what is best for my family and me. I am fascinated about what makes up a good life and the following passage got me thinking about the link between choice and income:

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More ‘working poor’ in need of Lindsay’s homeless shelter

in Community/Poverty Reduction by
More ‘working poor’ in need of Lindsay’s homeless shelter
Lorrie Polito and Dave Tilley of A Place Called Home.

At Lindsay’s homeless shelter, more people are driving themselves to get there these days.

That’s not a good sign according to Lorrie Polito, the executive director of ‘A Place Called Home,’ Lindsay’s 19-bed shelter.

Having a car suggests some level of income from having a job. It’s a sign of the desperation of the so-called ‘working poor,’ those who are employed on some level but yet not making enough to get by.

“There’s not a lot of quality jobs left in Lindsay,” says Dave Tilley, operations manager at A Place Called Home.

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