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Unions have a long, proud history of fighting for workers’ rights

in Social Issues by
Nine union members standing outside of the Central East Correctional Facility in Lindsay ON
Nine OPSEU members who work at the Central East Correctional Centre. Pictured are S. Dunn, M. Reade, R. Gilchrist, J. Guthrie, M. Sedgwick, S. Nelson, B. Bisso, K. Semple, and D. Troost. Photo: John Maclennan.

Few topics in politics are as divisive, even in polite company, as unionization. While Canadian courts have consistently upheld, and on more than a few occasions greatly expanded the rights of unions, affinity for organized labour has ebbed and flowed since the Royal Commission on the Relations of Labour and Capital said, “the man [person] who sells labour should, in selling it, be on an equality with the man [person] who buys it” in 1889.

The Royal Commission recognized the inherent power imbalance of industrial capitalism even as industrialization was creating an explosion in the size of the Canadian working class.
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Romance and mystery: ruins in Kawartha Lakes

in Just in Time by
The Lindsay CPR bridge abutment. Photo: Ian McKechnie.
The Lindsay CPR bridge abutment. Photo: Ian McKechnie.

A year and a half ago, I had the opportunity to spend a week in England. One sunny Sunday afternoon saw me sitting on a bench a short distance away from the Tower of London, munching on a large bag of candy I had purchased from Lindsay’s own Burns Bulk Food. Keep Reading

Tents and trailers: A history of camping in Kawartha Lakes

in Just in Time by
Tents and trailers: A history of camping in Kawartha Lakes

Twilight falls over a nearby lake as you stand at the foot of the picnic table and scrape the remnants of Hamburger Helper into a garbage bag. Hamburger Helper again? For the third night in a row? Why, of course — and scalloped potatoes from a box, too. You finish scraping the dishes and pile them into a tub of hot water.

The water was boiled in a dented kettle over the same Coleman stove you have brought on every summer vacation since, well, since … it doesn’t really matter. It’s been around for as long as you can remember. You have, after all, been doing this thing called camping since you were very young.

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Downeyville Hall does big time renos with legacy in mind

in Community by
Mary Connell (L) and Karen Cook (R) are part of the team responsible for the major renovations to the historic Downeyville Hall.

On paper, it made fiscal sense to tear down the historic Downeyville Hall and start anew from the ground up.

Indeed, even a cursory budget would have shown it was the wiser option, compared to undertaking a monumental, and more costly, renovation.

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‘A Great Event:’ The Lindsay winter carnival of 1912-1917

in Just in Time by
'A Great Event:' The Lindsay winter carnival of 1912-1917
Entrants line up for a cutter race in downtown Lindsay. Photo courtesy of Kawartha Lakes Public Library.

It’s the middle of winter in Lindsay, circa 1912. A fresh blanket of snow covers the ground, glistening like freshly-ground glass whenever the sun avails itself of an opportunity to peek through the clouds. A few cutters drift by, the jingling bells on the horses bringing some much-needed merriment to the cold, bleak surroundings. A distinguished-looking gentleman mutters an audible oath as he takes a spill on some black ice — leaving his new coat covered in dirt and snow, and leaving a passing group of churchgoing women aghast at his equally filthy choice of language.

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The Lindsay Canadian Club: An invitation to the community

in Around Town/Community by
Life and death of Munroe Scott

Imagine a community-based organization that invites people from all walks of life – millennials, seniors, students, retirees, people working full-time – to gather in an inclusive setting and hear dynamic voices from across Kawartha Lakes, Ontario, and Canada speak about some of the most important topics and issues affecting our community, province, country, and planet. Imagine spending an evening over drinks and eats with like-minded individuals who have gathered to hear guest speakers, chat with these change-makers, and engage with panelists.

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Summer in Fenelon Falls looks to be exciting in 2019

in Around Town by
Fenelon Falls Sign with locks in the background

What’s going on in Fenelon Falls this summer? What’s not going might be a better question.

Midnight Madness, a tradition for more than 25 years, happens on Saturday June 29. People can expect live music from three bands — North Country Express, The Blackfly Band, and the Harry Peterson Band — scattered through town. The shops will be open late and there’s a chance to reconnect with permanent and seasonal friends also out enjoying the night. Food vendors will be on hand.

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Summer in Fenelon Falls looks to be exciting in 2019

in Around Town/Community by
Fenelon Falls will be a busy place this summer. Photo: Geoff Coleman.

What’s going on in Fenelon Falls this summer? What’s not going might be a better question.

June 8 sees the Kawartha Yarn and Fibre Festival return to the village after a wildly successful inaugural year that saw more than 1,000 attendees at the one day show. Moving to bigger digs at the Fenelon Falls Community Centre, the Festival provides a showcase for small businesses and farms to connect directly with artisans and makers who are passionate about their work. For 2019, they offer an expanded selection of 80 vendors and 20 classes.

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St. Thomas Aquinas takes us back to the 1980s

in Around Town/Community/Education by
Aiden Shearer stars as Corey Palmer in Back to the 80s. Photo: St. Thomas Aquinas.

The decade spanning 1980 through 1990 was significant on multiple fronts.

The world watched as the Prince of Wales wed Lady Diana Spencer (1981) and as the Berlin Wall came tumbling down (1989). Canadians cheered on Terry Fox as he began his Marathon of Hope (1980); saw their Constitution repatriated (1982); and handled $1 coins for the first time (1987). Ontarians voted out the Progressive Conservative Party after over four decades in office (1985) and watched the SkyDome’s retractable roof open to a torrential downpour (1989).  Here in Victoria County, the Town of Lindsay celebrated its 125th anniversary by painting faces on fire hydrants (1982); the indefatigable Bill Scott represented his constituents in Ottawa; and Union Carbide announced that it would cease production of film, film packaging products, and industrial garbage bags at its Lindsay plant (1989).

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Memories and motor trips: Get-away in a Model A

in Just in Time by

For the past two decades, an annual summertime tradition in the McKechnie household has been the Model A Owners of Canada annual “Get-Away In A Model A” tour, usually taking place during the third weekend of August.  Suitcases, lawn chairs, coolers, and umbrellas are packed into the back of our 1930 Model A Ford town sedan, which has been our family since my father purchased it from the late Doug Windrem, of Omemee, almost 30 years ago.

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