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‘Social determinants’ of gun violence need to be addressed

in Letters to the Editor by
Gun amnesty update from police

This is in response to the article in the Advocate’s June 2020 magazine edition, “The Great Debate” on the proposed federal gun law.

Removing the newly listed (and unlisted) prohibited firearms won’t end or significantly reduce gun violence as the government, and society, are collectively seeking.

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Men can learn by listening

in Opinion by

I was lucky enough to grow up surrounded by strong women, many of whom — for the time — had non-traditional roles. I remember it being a point of pride that my mother was the first woman hired to perform what was then defined as a “man’s job” (pot-washer) at our local hospital back in the late 1970s.

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Students walk out to protest Ford’s looming education cuts

in Education by
Students protest at I.E. Weldon S.S. in Lindsay. Photos: Roderick Benns

It’s 1:07 pm and the hallways of I.E. Weldon Secondary School in Lindsay are more alive than usual. Students are milling around, signs tucked under arms.

They seep out of the school and gather just off school property, forming long lines of anticipation until they become a single, large mass.

Just after 1:15 pm – the time when about 80,000 students across Ontario are doing the same thing – Grade 11 student Tisza Pàl address the assembled students with a megaphone.

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Lindsay’s progressive pastor: The Reverend Dr. J.W. MacMillan

in Just in Time by

“The first duty of an industrial order, whatever its nature, is to provide for the needs of the people. Business is good, in the true sense, when all the people are maintained in decent comfort and wholesome security. Salaries for presidents of corporations and dividends on stock should come after that has been accomplished.”

These words were printed, not in last week’s business or opinion section of one of Canada’s major national newspapers, but in Lindsay’s Evening Post almost 100 years ago, in 1920. The author, a syndicated columnist whose writings appeared in newspapers across Canada, went by the byline, “J.W. MacMillan, D.D.” The post-nominal letters, which stand for Doctor of Divinity, tell us that MacMillan was a man of the cloth; a minister of word and sacrament. “What does he think he is doing, sticking his nose into public affairs?” a contemporary observer might sneer. “Shouldn’t he be concerned with matters of a purely spiritual nature? Do we not believe in the separation of Church and State?”

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