Kawartha Lakes' Finest Magazine

Tag archive

food

Beekeeper says his job creates a lot of buzz, especially during COVID

in Community by
Beekeeper says his job creates a lot of buzz
Beekeeper Jerry Jerrard of Bobcaygeon.

For most people, spring means the usual seasonal transitions, like planting new seeds and storing away the heavy coats. For beekeeper Jerry Jerrard, he is getting ready to sell starter beehives, known as nucleus colonies, or ‘nucs’ for short, to those who want to become the owners of buzzing, furry, honey-producing bees of their own. He produces hundreds of nucs each year.

Keep Reading

Kawartha Lakes Food Source launches Community Kitchen program with grant money

in Community/Social Issues by
Leslie Creeden, a Kawartha Lakes Food Source volunteer.

Thanks to an Ontario Trillium Fund Seed Grant, Kawartha Lakes Food Source (KLFS) has started a Community Kitchen program.

This new program is an opportunity for clients of the Lindsay Community Food Market (a non-traditional food bank owned and operated by KLFS) to grow more engaged in their community and strengthen their food literacy.

Keep Reading

Happiness is derived from community: Perspectives from a remote African village

in Opinion by
Happiness is derived from community: Perspectives from a remote African village

As a new immigrant to Canada, with little knowledge of domestic waste management realities, hearing of the introduction of a producer-pays model in Ontario by 2023 is worth commending.

It was interesting to read that only 9 per cent of plastic waste is recycled nationwide in Canada. Data here shows that incinerators burn just about 5 per cent of the waste, emitting carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, and just over 61 per cent of kitchen and yard waste is composted while our landfills suck up the greatest portion (72 per cent) and are filling up faster than we may have ever expected.

Keep Reading

Podcast teaser: Adapting to adjusting in 2020

in Community by
Student minister Kevin Fitzpatrick.

We adjust. We adapt. We learn.

Granted, some of us have achieved this more than others in 2020. And some have had to do more of it than others – often not for themselves, but for those they serve.

By his own admission, Kevin Fitzpatrick is no video producer.

Or, rather, he wasn’t until recently, at least. But the student minister who serves both Janetville and Mount Horeb United Churches rose to the challenge when he realized a nicely-produced, pre-recorded video church service would be the best – and safest – way to reach his congregations this Christmas.

Keep Reading

New home and new outlook for Kawartha Lakes Food Source

in Community/Social Issues by
Jessica Topfer, administration and programs centre manager at Kawartha Lakes Food Source, welcomes visitors at the new location. Photo: Nancy Payne.

“It’s fantastic.”

Heather Kirby, executive director of Kawartha Lakes Food Source, is clearly grinning behind her mask when she describes the new home for the organization. What’s her favourite part about the new location?

“All of it.”

The new location at 164 Needham St. in Lindsay is big, bright, and fully accessible. It has a walk-in cool room and a freezer built with grant money from Food Banks Canada, and plenty of room for storage and sorting.

Keep Reading

‘An outdoor grocery store:’ Lindsay Farmers Market re-opens

in Community by
It's a new normal but was a successful opening, says organizers. Photo: Jamie Morris.

The tone for customers of the newly-opened Lindsay Farmers Market was set by a hand-lettered scene at the single entry-point, in the library parking lot: “For the time being: Think of the market as an outdoor grocery store not a place to visit your neighbour.”

It had taken the market’s executive a month and a half to put together COVID-19 protocols and secure approvals. The health unit, the provincial farmers’ market association, and the city’s economic development department were all involved.

Keep Reading

Reader not impressed that he can’t bring food to his mother at Ross Memorial Hospital

in Letters to the Editor by

During these times of turmoil, most of us are already on edge having little control over the outcome.

More than a week ago, my 76-year-old mother was admitted to the hospital with a broken pelvis. She is now bedridden, lonely and in significant pain.

Keep Reading

First-year university student collects gifts for women staying at Women’s Resources

in Community by

“You don’t really guess that a lot of stuff could happen in a small town. People kind of turn a blind eye to it.”

These are the words of Raina McCue, an 18-year-old, first-year student of psychology at Trent University, regarding abuse and trauma suffered by women and their families. The month of December, while most often associated with the joys and giving spirit of the holiday season, is also the marker of a more somber occasion.

Keep Reading

More children than adults at A Place Called Home this Christmas

in Community/Social Issues by
APCH Board Chair Karen Round.

The sound of children’s voices during the holidays typically conjures feelings of warmth and sentimentality – unless, of course, those voices are in a homeless shelter.

It’s a jarring mental image but one that A Place Called Home in Lindsay is being forced to contemplate.

Keep Reading

Local farmers struggling from wet spring, overall effects of changing climate

in Community by
Local farmers struggling from wet spring, overall effects of changing climate
The Skrabek family. Photo: Sienna Frost.

After examining her soil-stained hands for a moment, Jessica Foote looks out at the fields of her farm, on which several acres of crops have already been lost this year. “We’re at the beck and call of mother nature,” she says, before wiping some of the soil from her hands. Foote, one of many area farmers struggling this year, is the owner of Lunar Rhythm Gardens has been working in agriculture since she was nine-years-old, under the guidance of her father.

Despite the high elevation of her Janetville property, flooding has already destroyed six acres of alfalfa, along with several of Foote’s lettuce crops.

“It’s the extremes that do it,” she says.

Keep Reading

Go to Top