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Benns’ Belief: Cherish our history, welcome new ways

in Opinion by

My best friend in my elementary school years was, to my knowledge, from the only Indian family in Lindsay — Deep Chatha. His parents owned Queensway Market and Queensway Motors, businesses that many readers will doubtless remember at Queen and St. David streets.

Deep was cool enough to have an Atari system and often after school we’d hang out at his house where we’d obliterate misshapen, pixelated asteroids.

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Council briefs: Cultural centre, road improvements, traffic calming

in Municipal by

Deferral of Cultural Centre Task Force

Donna Goodwin, economic development officer for arts, culture and heritage, asked council to defer the viability study of a Kawartha Lakes cultural centre until March 31, 2021.

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Benns’ Belief: We must resist the U.S. cultural assault

in Opinion by

One of the most irritating things I used to come across regularly in magazines was ads for U.S.-based products with fine print at the bottom that read “Canadian and foreign orders” should add “x” amount of money to cover shipping.

I was never irked at the extra cost; I was dismayed that we were listed separately from foreign orders — as if we were some Puerto Rico-like territory of the U.S.

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Eclectic artist is glass blower, flame worker, and designer

in Community by
Artist Theresa McPherson. Photo: Timber Masterson.

It’s an eclectic body of work, constantly drawing inspiration from images in pop culture. Combine that with her satirical look at the complex nature of human relationships and you get a sense of Teresa McPherson’s art.

McPherson, a Lindsay resident, doesn’t exactly allow herself to be pigeon-holed into one particular artistic expression, saying she is a “crafts person, designer, glass blower and flame worker.”

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All-female economic development department moves Kawartha Lakes forward

in Business/Municipal by
All-female economic development department moves Kawartha Lakes forward
Rebecca Mustard, Carlie Arbour, Kelly Maloney, Lindsey Schoenmakers, Laurie McCarthy.

Just inside the doors of the city’s economic development department is a cluster of framed photos depicting the nine people who work there.

It’s conspicuous not just because the photos are an unexpected touch for a department that some might assume would be a little rigid and dry (just how exciting could “economic development” really be?) but rather because since 2018 there hasn’t been a single man to be seen on that wall.

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Andrew Rafton named as paramedic chief; other committee highlights

in Municipal by

Andrew Rafton was appointed to paramedics chief, after serving as acting chief for the last several months.

Rafton has served Kawartha Lakes Paramedics for over 18 years and will serve as chief for the remainder of 2020, after which he plans to retire and a new chief will be appointed.

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Academy Theatre struggles with direction, leadership

in Community by
Academy Theatre struggles with direction, leadership
The Academy has been a cultural fixture in our area since 1893. Photo: Sienna Frost.

Ray Marshall served as general manager of Lindsay’s storied Academy Theatre from 1985 to 2006 — 21 consecutive years of service. After Marshall moved on, there have been at least nine general managers, and currently there is no general manager at all.

This revolving door — and the erosion of good will associated with it — is not only threatening the theatre’s reputation but its continued operation.

The Academy, said to be the most technically perfect theatre in Canada, is the crown cultural jewel of Lindsay. It was once led and nurtured by Dennis Sweeting, the founder of Kawartha Summer Theatre (KST), who was also the first president of the Association of Canadian Television and Radio Artists (ACTRA). His wife, Maggie Sweeting, was the administrator.

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We should go back to the future and risk being great

in Opinion by
Good urban planning “is a gift of its designers...to the future.” Photo: Roderick Benns.

In 1834, a town plan for Lindsay was envisioned on what was then nothing more than a cedar swamp. The planners envisioned something different, and grander than the Purdy Mills hamlet which had been established south of the Scugog River almost 15 years previously.

Kent and Victoria Streets were designed to be one and a half times wider than the standard 66-foot right of way. As the final report on Downtown Heritage Conservation District notes, this was done “presumably to highlight their importance but also to make maneuvering horses and carts that much easier.”

So urban planning for this area of our city has, from its very outset, consisted of a blend of anticipating future transit needs and a vision of something bigger and special.

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Anarchy in Kawartha Lakes: A local history of punk rock

in The Arts by
Anarchy in Kawartha Lakes: A local history of punk rock

Part One

Where there is young people and vitality, you’re going to find punk rock. — Henry Rollins

One of Lindsay’s most famous bar brawls and the start of punk rock in the CKL happened on the same time at the same place on the same night. It was the late spring of 1980 and Lindsay’s first punk rock band, The Lindsay Huns, were playing at The Central Hotel on William Street — a long gone Lindsay landmark.

Musicologists will argue about the exact start of punk, and who started it, but punk rock had been around, and had been a growing musical and cultural movement since 1977, and probably earlier. The term itself — coined in the early 70s — was used by a few musical journalists to describe the style known as garage-rock.

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Council approves working group to research cultural centre for Kawartha Lakes  

in The Arts by
Deputy Mayor Doug Elmslie and roundtable discussions.
Deputy Mayor Doug Elmslie.

At the March 19 Committee of the Whole (COW) meeting, Council heard from Dianne Lister and Susan Taylor, representatives from the Kawartha Lakes Arts Council (KLAC) and the Cultural Centre Committee, who recommended that Council strike a working group to examine the possibility of a cultural centre for the municipality.

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