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Canada Day reflection: An ‘accidental Canadian’ considers his roots

in Community/Opinion by

With Canada Day in the offing, I often think of how my extended family first arrived in this great land. My mother’s parents from Northern Ireland and Scotland made a conscious decision to immigrate to escape overpopulation and unemployment at home.

My Dad’s paternal grandfather left the Midlands of England hoping for more opportunity in a new land. However, my dad’s maternal grandfather had no intention of coming to Canada when he left Norway in 1894. Only through a series of unplanned and and life altering events did this former whaler not end up settling permanently in the United States, his intended new home, when he left Stokke, Norway at the age of 18.

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Schmale talks Conservative leadership race, COVID-19, indigenous blockades, and CBC

in Federal by
Anti-energy activists are creating a situation “where no one has permission to start anything" says Schmale.

Jamie Schmale, the Conservative member of parliament for Haliburton – Kawartha Lakes – Brock, spent 90 minutes with the Advocate, via telephone, to share what he has been doing, his views on the Conservative leadership race, the COVID-19 pandemic, funding for the CBC, and his role in the Conservative shadow cabinet.

Jamie Schmale has been back in his local riding since March 13. While parliament has re-opened in a limited way – one in-person sitting per week, augmented by two Zoom sittings – there is only a skeleton crew of parliamentarians needed who are selected by their individual parties.

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A view from Parliament Hill: COVID-19 shuts down House, Senate

in Federal/Health by
Local federal candidates square off with different visions for riding, country

The House of Commons and the Senate have shut down in response to the ongoing spread of COVID-19. Parliamentarians face an increased risk of contracting and spreading the virus as they meet with constituents, community groups, organizations, stakeholders and a wide variety of the public.

In response many Members of Parliament, ministers, the Prime Minister and his family had taken precautions by voluntarily self-isolating.

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Corporate pressure ended postal banking in 1968 — it’s time to bring it back

in Business/Community by
Like many small places, Reaboro has no bank but it does have a post office. Photo: Roderick Benns.

One of the very first things that the new Dominion of Canada did as a country, way back in April 1868, was create a postal bank. The idea was to create a banking system that Canadians could access easily — and to serve customers that the established banks of the time showed little interest in, namely lower-income customers and those in remote communities.

Successful lobbying by the banking industry led to the elimination of the postal bank in 1968. Virtually all of the key players in our current postal system — Canada Post; Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) and the Canadian Postmasters and Assistants Association (CPAA) — have examined the idea of re-establishing a postal bank.

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Basic income: Senator Kim Pate urges Senate to take action

in Social Issues by
Senator Kim Pate urges Senate to take action on basic income

Senator Kim Pate is urging senators to take action on supporting the implementation of a basic income in Canada.

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The public good means more public enterprises

in Opinion by

In the early 1900s, a Conservative MPP named Adam Beck campaigned diligently for a public power utility in Ontario.

The campaign was a success, thanks to the hard work of Beck and others. Beck and other allies knew there would be no benefit in creating a private corporation with the vast majority of profits going to shareholders, versus creating a public enterprise where the money is returned to our province.

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Life and death of Munroe Scott

in Opinion by
Life and death of Munroe Scott

When he was in his late 60s, Leonard Cohen said I don’t think much about death, but in a certain stage in your life it becomes very clear that your time is not unlimited.” I thought about this when I heard that Munroe Scott had recently died at Adelaide Place in Lindsay at 92, “peacefully in his sleep” as his obituary read. He had been battling cancer prior to the end of his third act.

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What is collaborative family law?

in Sponsored Content by
What is collaborative family law?
In the collaborative process, lawyers are specially trained to remain focused on settlement.

Collaborative family law has grown in popularity over the last 25 years and has been embraced by family law practitioners to varying degrees. The collaborative family law movement began in the Western American states and was later adopted in British Columbia as one of the first provinces in Canada to embrace a shift in family law towards alternative forms of dispute resolution. Since that time, many lawyers across the country have embraced a transition to the collaborative process, perhaps in light of the fact that most family law cases settle before they reach the adjudication phase of litigation.

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From the ashes, a new beginning

in Community/Environment by
A tractor lifts 13 replacement trees into place. Photo: Jamie Morris.

Last month the Advocate reported on the loss of the 13  trees in Lindsay’s tiny Peace Park, located just north of Central Senior Public School on Albert Street. All were ash, all were infested by emerald ash borers. It was, on a small scale, a foretaste of what is happening across the City; experts say all of our 24,000 ash trees will succumb. 

For Peace Park, the loss was particularly poignant:  A plaque mounted near the stumps let visitors know the trees had represented not only our ten provinces and three territories, but “hope for the future.” 

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Benns’ Belief: This land is our land — and we must protect it

in Opinion by
Miles Canyon, Yukon. Photo: Roderick Benns.

“We no longer see the world as a single entity. We’ve moved to cities and we think the economy is what gives us our life …without regard to what it does to the rest of the world.” – David Suzuki

It’s a privilege to be able to drive across Canada, not the least of which is because it helps one understand the essence of the country better than dropping in on big cities by plane. However, the cost of lodging, gasoline, and time away from jobs makes it next to impossible for too many Canadians.

So, it was indeed a privilege for us to be able to travel over 12,500 kilometres to the Yukon and back a few years ago for over a month, seeing this great country in a way that few of us do.

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