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‘Basic Income Plus’ could be even more ambitious

in Letters to the Editor by

I love the policy proposals in your recent editorial regarding Basic Income Plus, although I think it could be even more ambitious.

We must demand it be implemented at the federal level and funded with federal dollars. Canadians should not be burdened with the costs of much-needed reforms that are long overdue – and we don’t have to be.

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Former PM John Turner and the Arctic Youth Corp

in Federal/Opinion by
John Turner, Canada's 17th prime minister and avid canoeist.

The South Nahanni River is one of the world’s great waterways. At 563 km long it snakes through the Selwyn Mountains and part of the Mackenzie Mountains in Canada’s vast Northwest Territories.

Along its storied water path you’ll find all manner of hot springs, glaciers, marshes, desert-like landscapes, incredible hoodoos, and bottomless lakes.

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Benns’ Belief: We must resist the U.S. cultural assault

in Opinion by

One of the most irritating things I used to come across regularly in magazines was ads for U.S.-based products with fine print at the bottom that read “Canadian and foreign orders” should add “x” amount of money to cover shipping.

I was never irked at the extra cost; I was dismayed that we were listed separately from foreign orders — as if we were some Puerto Rico-like territory of the U.S.

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Memorial blanket for COVID-19 victims to contain more than 9,000 squares

in Community by

There is a long history of Canadians knitting during times of crisis. In the past, knitting provided a very tangible service. One need only think of care packages sent to soldiers during the First World War and Second World War, containing hand-knitted socks for soldiers.

During the current pandemic crisis, a group of local knitters want to use their skills in a way that would be similarly helpful. In this case, however, the end result will be a memorial blanket for all of those who have died in Canada due to COVID-19.

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Canada Day reflection: An ‘accidental Canadian’ considers his roots

in Community/Opinion by

With Canada Day in the offing, I often think of how my extended family first arrived in this great land. My mother’s parents from Northern Ireland and Scotland made a conscious decision to immigrate to escape overpopulation and unemployment at home.

My Dad’s paternal grandfather left the Midlands of England hoping for more opportunity in a new land. However, my dad’s maternal grandfather had no intention of coming to Canada when he left Norway in 1894. Only through a series of unplanned and and life altering events did this former whaler not end up settling permanently in the United States, his intended new home, when he left Stokke, Norway at the age of 18.

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Schmale talks Conservative leadership race, COVID-19, indigenous blockades, and CBC

in Federal by
Anti-energy activists are creating a situation “where no one has permission to start anything" says Schmale.

Jamie Schmale, the Conservative member of parliament for Haliburton – Kawartha Lakes – Brock, spent 90 minutes with the Advocate, via telephone, to share what he has been doing, his views on the Conservative leadership race, the COVID-19 pandemic, funding for the CBC, and his role in the Conservative shadow cabinet.

Jamie Schmale has been back in his local riding since March 13. While parliament has re-opened in a limited way – one in-person sitting per week, augmented by two Zoom sittings – there is only a skeleton crew of parliamentarians needed who are selected by their individual parties.

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A view from Parliament Hill: COVID-19 shuts down House, Senate

in Federal/Health by
Local federal candidates square off with different visions for riding, country

The House of Commons and the Senate have shut down in response to the ongoing spread of COVID-19. Parliamentarians face an increased risk of contracting and spreading the virus as they meet with constituents, community groups, organizations, stakeholders and a wide variety of the public.

In response many Members of Parliament, ministers, the Prime Minister and his family had taken precautions by voluntarily self-isolating.

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Corporate pressure ended postal banking in 1968 — it’s time to bring it back

in Business/Community by
Like many small places, Reaboro has no bank but it does have a post office. Photo: Roderick Benns.

One of the very first things that the new Dominion of Canada did as a country, way back in April 1868, was create a postal bank. The idea was to create a banking system that Canadians could access easily — and to serve customers that the established banks of the time showed little interest in, namely lower-income customers and those in remote communities.

Successful lobbying by the banking industry led to the elimination of the postal bank in 1968. Virtually all of the key players in our current postal system — Canada Post; Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) and the Canadian Postmasters and Assistants Association (CPAA) — have examined the idea of re-establishing a postal bank.

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Basic income: Senator Kim Pate urges Senate to take action

in Social Issues by

Senator Kim Pate is urging senators to take action on supporting the implementation of a basic income in Canada.

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The public good means more public enterprises

in Opinion by

In the early 1900s, a Conservative MPP named Adam Beck campaigned diligently for a public power utility in Ontario.

The campaign was a success, thanks to the hard work of Beck and others. Beck and other allies knew there would be no benefit in creating a private corporation with the vast majority of profits going to shareholders, versus creating a public enterprise where the money is returned to our province.

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