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agriculture

Wanted: Farmers with innovative ideas – who need to money to make them happen

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When Jack Roks sees the large towers where Mariposa Dairy puts its milk, he’s reminded of how a small, innovative idea can become a thriving international business.

“Mariposa (Dairy) started out in someone’s kitchen and now produces goat cheese for Canada (and the U.S.),” says Roks, president of the Community Foundation of Kawartha Lakes.

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Plowing match postponed for one year due to COVID-19

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Lindsay lands International Plowing Match 2020 with expected 80,000 visitors

The 103rd edition of the International Plowing Match and Rural Expo (IPM) has been postponed until October 2021.

The IPM will run from October 13 to October 16, 2021, and will be held at the Lindsay Fairgrounds and neighbouring farms in Lindsay.

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Crop planting jeopardy: Temporary foreign workers delayed for Kawartha Lakes

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Local agricultural production is in jeopardy due to the delays of temporary foreign workers arriving in Kawartha Lakes, due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

According to Kelly Maloney, Kawartha Lakes’ agriculture development officer, there are 43 temporary foreign workers expected in Kawartha Lakes between now and May 12.

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The elusive waters of spring are essential for our farm land

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Every spring, as I walk through the woods on my farm, I see the pools of water that appear between and around the trees. They remind me of the wood between the worlds, made famous in C.S. Lewis’s stories about Narnia. By jumping into a shallow pool in the woods, one is able to enter whole other worlds, some old, some new. All linked by the woods where the pools live.

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Federal election Q & A with Barbara Doyle of the New Democratic Party (NDP)

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Federal election Q & A with Barbara Doyle of the New Democratic Party (NDP)
Barbara Doyle, candidate for the New Democratic Party.

Roderick Benns recently interviewed the PPC, Conservative, Liberal, Green, and NDP candidates for Haliburton, Kawartha Lakes, Brock riding to help voters make an informed decision leading up to the election in October. In our second installment we connect with Barbara Doyle of the NDP.

Benns: Can you highlight a policy of your party that will lead to increased employment and increased average income in our riding? 

Doyle: The NDP will start by immediately increasing the minimum wage to $15 that will help over 900,000 workers across the country while supporting small businesses with the access to service they need to grow, innovate and stay competitive in Canada and around the world. That’s why we have stood up for lower small business taxes, opposed unfair merchant fees, and fought to make it easier to pass on small businesses to the next generation by ending the unfair tax treatment of family transfers of small businesses.

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‘Raise the Song of Harvest Home’

in Just in Time by

September 17, 1997. A terrifying sight is bringing up the rear of Lindsay’s annual Fair Parade. An 80-year-old steam engine (more properly called a traction engine), complete with a water wagon and antique threshing machine in tow, inches its way up Kent Street.

Terrifying, you say? Yes, indeed. To a six or seven-year-old child, the column of grey smoke rising from the chimney of this fire-breathing monster built by George White & Sons Co. of London, Ontario, means only one thing: its whistle will soon be shrieking like a banshee as it passes by on route to the [old] Lindsay fairgrounds.

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Local farmers struggling from wet spring, overall effects of changing climate

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Local farmers struggling from wet spring, overall effects of changing climate
The Skrabek family. Photo: Sienna Frost.

After examining her soil-stained hands for a moment, Jessica Foote looks out at the fields of her farm, on which several acres of crops have already been lost this year. “We’re at the beck and call of mother nature,” she says, before wiping some of the soil from her hands. Foote, one of many area farmers struggling this year, is the owner of Lunar Rhythm Gardens has been working in agriculture since she was nine-years-old, under the guidance of her father.

Despite the high elevation of her Janetville property, flooding has already destroyed six acres of alfalfa, along with several of Foote’s lettuce crops.

“It’s the extremes that do it,” she says.

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Water: How farmers meet the challenge of too little, too much

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Leslie Dyment, at Crow Hill Farm in Cameron.

Farmers have been concerned about water issues for as long as human beings have been growing crops. From the irrigation ditches of the ancient near east, to the flooding of ancient Egypt, the lack of water, or too much of it, has shaped the rhythms of farming life.

As a result, farmers throughout history have developed various strategies related to water. Some of these—like the worship of ancient fertility gods and goddesses—seem a little odd to us now. Some, like tile drainage, are still practiced but are somewhat controversial. Others, such as the use of terrace farming and dams, continue to be used today.

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Lindsay lands International Plowing Match 2020 with expected 80,000 visitors

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Lindsay lands International Plowing Match 2020 with expected 80,000 visitors

The Ontario Plowmen’s Association (OPA) has announced the location of the 2020 International Plowing Match and Rural Expo will be Kawartha Lakes, at the Lindsay Exhibition Fairgrounds.

“We looked at several potential locations for IPM 2020 and this one ticked all the boxes,” says newly minted OPA President Sheila Marshall. “It’s a great spot, in a fantastic, agriculturally rich community. “We’re excited to bring the IPM and its 80,000-plus visitors to Kawartha Lakes.”

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Permaculture: A better approach to gardening for your health, wealth, and environment

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If you want to be an environmentally conscious gardener or homeowner, it may be worth considering an alternative method to planning your property. The traditional North American suburban lawn and garden typically requires much maintenance, generous amounts of watering and the addition of fertilizers and chemicals in order to be successful.

These activities degrade land and incorporate pollutants into the local environment. Quite recently, around the world, a new movement has brought hope for the future of our planet, and it starts with the homeowner.

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