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Octoblocks: Trustees hear pros and cons of 22 days of only one class
Education

Octoblocks: Trustees hear pros, cons of 22 days of only one class

Trillium Lakelands District School Board staff and trustees spent much of their recent board meeting looking at statistical and anecdotal evidence about the first high school octoblock that ended Oct. 16.

For readers unfamiliar with an octoblock, the board decided as a public health measure to limit student contacts to one class and have students take one subject only for five hours a day for 22 straight days.

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Multiple bus cancellations could happen by Thanksgiving due to driver shortages

in Education by

Sinead Fegan, communications officer for the Trillium Lakelands District School Board, and Tim Ellis, superintendent of business, have shared publicly for the first time this week that the board’s transportation suppliers are finding it difficult to recruit bus drivers for fall 2020, and that this driver shortage may create serious issues later in October.

“Yes, currently the transportation operators are having an issue with finding drivers,” Fegan wrote in an email to the Advocate.

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Learning at home, HVAC funding among challenges for TLDSB

in Education by
Distance learning may be the new reality for Ontario students

Senior staff at Trillium Lakelands Board of Education made sure trustees were aware at their regular September meeting of the challenges they’re facing — including upgrading HVAC systems.

The challenge, according to superintendent of business Tim Ellis, is that although the board received additional funding for HVAC updates of more than $500,000, boards only have eight weeks to spend it or lose it.

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Local residents take action to improve long-term care

in Community/Health by

Concerned local residents from Haliburton County and Kawartha Lakes have banded together to form the Haliburton-CKL Long-Term Care Coalition to campaign for changes to nursing homes and how residents are cared for in Ontario and nationally.

“So many of us have had experiences with the long-term care system,” notes Haliburton community resident, Bonnie Roe. “COVID-19 has laid bare what we have all known for a long time – there’s an urgent need for improvement.”

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COVID testing demands see RMH line-ups extend to Sussex Street

in Health by
COVID testing lines have been extra long of late. Photo: William McGinn.

Lineups to get a COVID test at Ross Memorial Hospital (RMH) have seen drastic growth, sometimes stretching all the way down Kent Street to Sussex Street.

While the hospital averages about 200 tests a day, just three days ago RMH saw a record 394 people.

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City’s decision ‘ludicrous’ on Kent Street trees

in Letters to the Editor by

I am stunned and disappointed that the City would not use the silva cells (New project in downtown Lindsay supports healthy tree canopy – August edition of The Lindsay Advocate) on both sides of Kent Street.

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‘Basic Income Plus’ could be even more ambitious

in Letters to the Editor by

I love the policy proposals in your recent editorial regarding Basic Income Plus, although I think it could be even more ambitious.

We must demand it be implemented at the federal level and funded with federal dollars. Canadians should not be burdened with the costs of much-needed reforms that are long overdue – and we don’t have to be.

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Nigerian family finds local area welcoming as they seek new opportunities

in Community by
From left to right: Francis and Tobi Ogunnowo. Photo: Jamie Morris

From Lagos to Lindsay. From a city in Nigeria five times the size of Toronto to a town of some 21,000 souls. Quite a leap to jump an ocean and a continent, but Tobi and Francis Ogunnowo did so — and found welcoming arms.

Tobi and Francis, their then-seven-year-old daughter, Oreofe, and six-month-old son, Victor, arrived in Lindsay in May 2018. A week after coming to town, they started tackling the logistics of settling in.

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Former PM John Turner and the Arctic Youth Corp

in Federal/Opinion by
John Turner, Canada's 17th prime minister and avid canoeist.

The South Nahanni River is one of the world’s great waterways. At 563 km long it snakes through the Selwyn Mountains and part of the Mackenzie Mountains in Canada’s vast Northwest Territories.

Along its storied water path you’ll find all manner of hot springs, glaciers, marshes, desert-like landscapes, incredible hoodoos, and bottomless lakes.

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Strumbellas’s James sees coming to aid of Academy as payback to theatre

in The Arts by

After years of touring the world with an internationally-recognized and highly-respected band, Darryl James decided it was time to come home.

James, bass player for The Strumbellas, and wife Robyn are raising their three children in Lindsay, where he grew up.

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Being Black in Kawartha Lakes

in Community by
Olivia Reevie, left, with her sister, Morgan Reevie. Photo: Erin Burrell.

Since the murder of George Floyd on May 25 in Minneapolis, U.S., Black Canadians and their allies have raised their voices and called for an end to systemic racism wherever it is found, as well as for equality for all. Protests have occurred in centres large and small right across Canada, including Kawartha Lakes.

It has taken considerable courage for Black individuals to come forward, particularly in a community like Kawartha Lakes where they are such a tiny and exposed minority, with few places to hide from those who hold racist views.

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