Winner – New Business of the Year

Category archive

Poverty Reduction - page 2

Summer Lunch Program gears up in Lindsay, Fenelon Falls

in Poverty Reduction by
Summer Lunch Program gears up in Lindsay, Fenelon Falls

The Food Security Working Group, a committee of the Kawartha Lakes Food Coalition, will be offering the Summer Outreach Lunch Program for children again this year. The Salvation Army, Kawartha Lakes Food Source and the HKPR District Health Unit, as part of the committee, are partnering on this project.

Keep Reading

Two Lindsay families receive keys to new Habitat homes

in Community/Poverty Reduction by
The Sorensen family get their keys.

Two very excited families are moving into their new homes in Lindsay thanks to Habitat for Humanity Peterborough & Kawartha Region, local volunteers, and community partners. A Home Dedication Ceremony took place at 39 & 41 Hamilton Street in Lindsay, where supporters gathered to celebrate the 35th and 36th families that Habitat has helped into safe, decent and affordable housing.

“We prayed and dreamed for years about owning our own home – a place that is ours,” said Tara Sorensen. “It didn’t seem like it would ever happen!” Owning a home has been a lifelong goal for the Sorensen family: Tara, Sean, and their two children, Jahmes (4), and Sean Jr. (8 months). Despite working hard and earning a steady income, this goal felt far out of reach.

Keep Reading

Ford government fails people on disability in move from BI to ODSP; pharmacists step in

in Community/Poverty Reduction by
Pharmacists like Cathy Puffer at Remedy'sRx have stepped in to help. Photo: Sienna Frost.

A local social worker is sounding the alarm over the transition for people who were collecting basic income and then returned to ODSP, which left some people on disability with a gap in medication coverage.

Karla Forgaard-Pullen, a social worker based in Lindsay, says that some of the basic income recipients who were previously on ODSP (Ontario Disability Support Program) are on a backlogged list waiting for their return to the program to be green lit. The basic income program issued its last payment in March.

Keep Reading

Community Care dental clinic available no matter one’s income level

in Health/Poverty Reduction by
It’s hoped that the lower fees will help more families access regular oral health services.

April has been proclaimed as Oral Health Month by the Ontario Oral Health Alliance, the ideal time to talk about the need for everyone in this country to have access to affordable dental care.

Currently, Ontario Health Insurance (OHIP) covers health care for every part of a person’s body, except teeth and gums. A recent study by Public Health Ontario found that one in five Ontarians does not visit a dentist because they cannot afford it. The cost of oral health services and/or lack of private coverage can significantly deter many local residents from obtaining proper, regular dental care. As a result, thousands of people in this province suffer with pain and infection from poor oral health.

Keep Reading

Food insecurity, affordable housing, and ‘freedom from want’

in Municipal/Poverty Reduction by
City says it's 'turning a corner' on affordable housing supply

Norman Rockwell’s Freedom from Want is one of the best-known of all American paintings. You might not know it by its title, but you would recognize it. An extended family is gathered around a table at Thanksgiving.

Food on the table. A roof over your head. Basic human needs.

At the most recent Committee of the Whole, councillors and city staff heard presentations on how we’re addressing those basic needs.

Hard to imagine individuals better qualified to provide a briefing: Aisha Malik, Chair of the Food Security Working Group and Public Health Dietitian with the Health Unit joined Heather Kirby, Chair of the KL Food Coalition and General Manager of the KL Food source to address food insecurity. The presenter on affordable housing was Hope Lee, the City’s Manager of Housing.

Both presentations painted a clear picture of the current situation, of what’s being done and of what should be done in the future. Both deserve a wider audience.

Keep Reading

$200 million class action filed over basic income

in Poverty Reduction/Provincial by

The Advocate has learned that the four participants in the province’s basic income pilot project are seeking $200 million in general damages. To that end, they have filed a multi-million class-action lawsuit against the Ford government over its early cancellation of the project.

The lawsuit, filed with the court in Lindsay, alleges the government breached its contract with the pilot project’s 4,000 participants in the communities of Lindsay, Thunder Bay and Hamilton. The plaintiffs also claim the government was negligent and breached its undertaking and common law duties in deciding to cancel the project only one year into its three-year term.

Keep Reading

Class action lawsuit filed, seeking justice for basic income recipients

in Poverty Reduction/Provincial by
Tracey Mechefske and Dana Bowman, plaintiffs, Mike Perry, lawyer and social worker, Roderick Benns, Lindsay Advocate publisher.

As expected, four people from Lindsay who had been receiving payments through the Ontario Basic Income Pilot have launched a proposed class action against the PC government for its premature cancellation.

The three-year OBIP began in 2017, with international eyes on it as among the most comprehensive pilots in the world, but the current government cancelled it in 2018, before gathering its own follow-up information from participants.

The applicants are Dana Bowman, Grace Marie Doyle Hillion, Susan Lindsay, and Tracey Mechefske, all from Lindsay. A statement of claim was filed today by the Toronto law firm of Cavalluzzo LLP. The firm is “dedicated to social advocacy and the protection of working people.”

Keep Reading

‘Demonstrate that you truly have the concerns of your constituents at heart’

in Poverty Reduction/Provincial by
There has been no attempt at communication even by phone, email, or through her staff. Photo: Roderick Benns

On Day Three of a protest to seek an apology for the premature cancellation of basic income, the question on many people’s minds is just where is local MPP Laurie Scott anyway?

The question comes not only from the protesters, led by local lawyer and social worker Mike Perry, but also from many of her constituents through letters to the editor and social media. While most people recognize she has duties and obligations at Queen’s Park in Toronto, there has been no attempt at communication even by phone, email, or through her staff.

Keep Reading

Transportation and child care: Key barriers to work in Kawartha Lakes

in Municipal/Poverty Reduction by
Transportation and child care: Key barriers to work in Kawartha Lakes
A lack of affordable or flexible childcare is another employment barrier here.

Until his work accident, ‘Tom’ had always had regular employment. Deemed medically unfit to work by a team of doctors, and denied WSIB benefits, Tom had to sell his possessions and eventually the family vehicle to feed his family.

He had to move from Lindsay to a rural part of the city in search of less expensive rent. Finally cleared to return to work, Tom faced what employment professionals call a ‘barrier’ to work.

“The (time off from the) accident had used up every available dollar I could borrow from friends and family. I had already sold anything of value. I needed a car to get a job. And I needed a job to get a car. I was in this feedback loop of failure,” he says.

Keep Reading

Basic income sit-in participants — even media — barred from entry to MPP’s office

in Poverty Reduction/Provincial by
n Monday Perry had led a small group to protest in front of Scott’s office

On day two of a peaceful protest in front of local MPP Laurie Scott’s office, lawyer and social worker Mike Perry was informed they were not welcome to enter the constituency office. Neither, apparently, is media, as Scott’s staff members would not even let Pamela VanMeer of Kawartha411 in to ask a question about the protest.

Not even the postal carrier could get in because of the locked door and simply moved on with the day’s mail.

Keep Reading

Go to Top