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Dozens protest against education cuts in front of Laurie Scott’s office

in Around Town/Education by
Thousands protested against the Conservative government's education cuts across Ontario. Photo: Alexis Benns.

By the thousands, teachers, education workers, parents and community allies took their anger to the streets all across Ontario today to say they aren’t happy with the PC government’s planned cuts to education. This included dozens of people right here in Kawartha Lakes, who protested in front of MPP Laurie Scott’s office. Scott also serves as minister of labour.

The Conservative government is in budget consultation mode and Premier Doug Ford has mused about cutting full day Kindergarten, class sizes, and has already slashed $600 million in cuts to student grants and $440 million in funding cuts to universities and colleges.

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Rally against cuts to education in front of Scott’s office next week

in Around Town/Education by

Teachers, education workers, parents and community allies are planning to rally against cuts to education in front of Laurie Scott’s office on Thursday February 7 from 3:30-4 pm. This will coincide with rallies across Ontario at most MPPs’ offices.

The Conservative government is in budget consultation mode and as the number of announcements about education policy begin to pile up the landscape is increasingly discouraging for educators. Ford ran on a promise to cut 4 per cent from the Ontario budget, a cut that would mean approximately $1 billion to education and more than $8 million in Trillium-Lakelands alone.

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ETFO urges Ontario government to make investments in public education

in Education by
EQAO results show students struggling, especially Grade 3

In 2019 pre-budget hearings, the Elementary Teachers Federation of Ontario (ETFO) urged the Ontario government to make investments, not cuts, in public education to better prepare all students for success.

“Our students’ education and future should not be sacrificed in the government’s zeal to cut spending, particularly when tax cuts have disproportionately benefited corporations and high-income earners and Ontario’s public program spending as a share of GDP is the lowest in the country,” ETFO president Sam Hammond told members of the Standing Committee on Finance and Economic Affairs. ETFO’s submission can be viewed at www.etfo.ca/link/pbb2019

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Robertson retires after nearly 29 years at helm of Boys and Girls Club

in Community/Local News by
Scott Robertson is retiring from the Boys and Girls Club. Photo: Erin Smith.

Roderick Benns recently interviewed Scott Robertson, executive director of the Boys and Girls Club of Kawartha Lakes. As he gets set to retire later this month after nearly 30 years at the helm, we asked him a few questions about the changes he has seen and the kids’ lives he has watched unfold over many years.

Benns: What are some key ways the Club has changed over 30 years in terms of what your organization is all about? How has the core mission evolved?

Robertson: Our mission really hasn’t changed. Today we operate under the Mission and core Values of Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada. Even though we weren’t a Boys and Girls Club in the beginning, the Club was founded on beliefs that were very compatible.

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More than a third of basic income recipients went back to school: Survey

in Community/Education/Health/Poverty Reduction by
“I am forever grateful I was chosen to be a recipient, and I wish that one day all countries would adopt this method of caring for those who have less income."

OBIP Chronicles – More than 33 per cent of respondents to a survey about the Ontario Basis Income Pilot were going back to school to further their education.

Jenna, a woman in her 40s, says her partner was able to go back to school and their son was able to participate in activities that helps with his motor disorder.

“My partner felt previous problems returning,” after the basic income pilot’s cancellation she says in the survey. “We only received a very small amount of money, comparatively, but it made a huge difference.”

More than 1,500 of the 4,000 basic income pilot recipients agreed to help the Basic Income Canada Network and the Ontario Basic Income Network continue working for a basic income. BICN conducted a survey of those people. Well over 400 responses have already come back, representing more than 10 per cent of those receiving basic income in Ontario, allowing us to write this special series. The Lindsay Advocate, working in cooperation with BICN, is pleased to be the media partner highlighting these stories. Names have been changed to protect identities.

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Faithful giving at St. Thomas Aquinas

in Around Town/Community/Education/Poverty Reduction by
Students provided donations geared to the age of the children, as well as items for the family as a whole.

True to its commitment to not only providing education, but also to helping its students live out their faith, St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Secondary School in Lindsay has just wrapped up a campaign that saw the school community providing gifts for families in need.

As part of the school’s ‘Be an Angel’ program, the families were identified by St. Vincent de Paul, the Roman Catholic charity, and assigned to the school for some seasonal kindness.

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Summer lunch program fed hundreds of kids across Lindsay

in Community/Health/Poverty Reduction by

If it takes a village to raise a child, a town can also come together to help feed kids through the summer month as sometimes kids just need a little bit more.

This is what’s happened in Lindsay this year, where an innovative Summer Outreach Lunch Program pilot, providing healthy bagged lunches to children, was launched.

It was brought to the attention of the Food Security Working Group of Kawartha Lakes Food Coalition that some students in Lindsay get anxious and sad during the summer months about not having enough to eat, especially without school lunch and snack programs in place.

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Should students have tenants insurance?

in Business/Opinion by
Should students have tenants insurance?

As the new school year is upon us, students are preparing to move away (or move back to) college or university; an important consideration is to have insurance in place that covers your personal belongings, as well as liability.

Some student residences or housing may require you to have your own tenant’s policy, but check first, you may already have coverage under your parents’ property policy. Here are five reasons tenant issuance is a good idea, even when it is not required.

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Five reasons to support Tibetan dinner at the Armoury in Lindsay

in Around Town/Community/Local News by

All is set for Lindsay’s 15th annual Machik Dinner, an event that has introduced many to Tibetan food and culture and over the years raised $300,000 to support the educational work of an organization founded and led by a remarkable local family, the Rabgeys.

The dinner will be held at the Victoria Park Armoury on Saturday, October 13, with a bazaar and silent auction starting at 5 pm and the dinner itself at 6 pm.

In recent years roughly 200 have purchased the tickets. If you haven’t been among them, here are five reasons you might want to join in this year:

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Back To School: Post-Secondary pursuits, past and present

in Education/Just in Time by
Trent University is one of a few popular post-secondary choices for local graduates.

A familiar ritual plays out across Kawartha Lakes on the first Tuesday of September. It’s a ritual that most of us have participated in – sometimes grudgingly, often anxiously. For those living in the countryside, this ritual involves waiting at the end of a long laneway for a yellow bus.

For those in town, it involves making a five, 10, 15, or 20-minute journey by foot, or occasionally by car. Parents reassure their children that they will do well on their first day of Kindergarten, while down the street their teen-aged counterparts are gaily exchanging pleasantries about their summer break, and comparing notes about who is taking what classes this semester.

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