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A personal note from the publisher about The Lindsay Advocate

in Columnists/Community/Poverty Reduction by
A personal note from the publisher about The Lindsay Advocate
Photo by Jerry Holder.

It has been four short months since The Lindsay Advocate launched and it feels like we already belong here. For that, we owe thanks to all our readers.

Our focus has been – and will continue to be – on the social and economic wellness of Lindsay. With growth, we are open to extending that vision to all of Kawartha Lakes.

Readers have responded to this vision in droves and that tells us we are responding to genuine community need.

The inspiration for The Advocate comes from two places.

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King Albert: Lindsay school works with community to overcome income barriers

in Community/Health/Poverty Reduction by
King Albert Public School Principal, Dean Burke, with some of the items received for Christmas donations. Over 20 families were supported through the community partners who support the school.

Part Two. This year, Statistics Canada has released new data on the social and economic well-being of cities and towns across Canada. This is part two in a series about Lindsay’s 12 lowest income neighbourhood zones and how they are coping in a challenging economic environment. To read Part One go here.

This is a story about a community coming together to fight an all-too-common scourge – the fact that incomes are too low to meet people’s needs.

Call it poverty. Call it scarcity. It doesn’t much matter.

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The week before Christmas at A Place Called Home

in Around Town/Community/Poverty Reduction by
Christmas at A Place Called Home
A Place Called Home staff members, Christina Alden (left) and Jennifer Lopinski (right).

As families settle into holiday mode its worth reflecting on the fact that not everyone has a place to live – even in a small town like Lindsay.

Just four days before Christmas, there are 17 people in town – three of them children under 12 – who are homeless. Fortunately, they’ve got A Place Called Home to get them through what is hopefully a temporary situation.

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Soup kitchen and Sunday supper: St. Andrew’s Church works to build community

in Community/Poverty Reduction by
Soup kitchen and Sunday supper: St. Andrew's Church works to build community
One of three Sunday supper teams from St. Andrews Presbyterian Church.

For 16 years Reverend Linda Park has ministered at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church in Lindsay, and she vividly remembers the vandalism and break and enters in the early days. They happened at the downtown church all too often.

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‘We’re hoping it will transform lives’: Poverty reduction minister in Lindsay

in Around Town/Community/Poverty Reduction by
‘We're hoping it will transform lives’: Poverty reduction minister in Lindsay
Minister of Poverty Reduction Peter Milczyn. Celebrations, top right, Kawartha Lakes Public Library, bottom right, sites of open basic income sign-ups.

Jasmine Bellwood is a young Lindsay mother with a part-time job and full-time worries. Her worries are mainly about providing for her 15-month-old son.

She’s also anxious about doing this brief interview but then relents when The Lindsay Advocate offers to change her name.

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Lindsay basic income pilot: Mental health, resilience will surely improve

in Around Town/Columnists/Poverty Reduction by
Lindsay basic income pilot: Mental health, resilience will surely improve
Basic income could help create less pressure, less anxiety.

Basic income open enrollment sessions begin this week here in Lindsay. If you haven’t registered and you think you might be ‘working poor’ or on Ontario Works, you should check out the simplified process.

This Lindsay basic income pilot is an incredible opportunity for our town. It not only has the capacity to change individual lives, but to create community-level change, too.

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Need a better income? Open enrollment sessions here for Lindsay’s Basic Income pilot

in Around Town/Community/Poverty Reduction by
Need more money? Open enrollment sessions here for Lindsay’s Basic Income pilot
Open enrollment sessions for the basic income pilot will be held at Celebrations or Kawartha Lakes Library (pictured).

The Ontario government is now holding the first ever open enrollment sessions in Lindsay for its basic income pilot, with the first one scheduled in Lindsay for Nov. 30 at Celebrations (the old Queen Street United Church).

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If Ontario Works, boutique tax credits go, Schmale on board with basic income

in Around Town/Community/Poverty Reduction by

Haliburton-Kawartha Lakes-Brock Conservative MP Jamie Schmale has clarified his position on basic income, saying he’s all for the pilot if Ontario Works is eliminated and the boutique tax credits go.

Schmale, who was not as specific in his first interview with The Lindsay Advocate, clarified his remarks on The Advocate’s active social media presence on Facebook.

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Senator Art Eggleton: Will Lindsay be the next Dauphin, Manitoba?

in Around Town/Community/Poverty Reduction by

One of Canada’s most well-known inequality fighters, Senator Art Eggleton, inspired members of the Ontario Basic Income Network recently who were in Lindsay for their annual general meeting.

In his opening remarks, Eggleton wondered aloud if Lindsay would become known as “the Dauphin, Manitoba of this decade.”

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Basic income panel talks about hope, human rights, and the choice we make to allow poverty

in Columnists/Poverty Reduction by
Basic income panel talks about hope, human rights, and the choice we make to allow poverty
L to R: Andrew Wallen, KLCFDC, Tim Ellis, Bert Lauwers, Rob Rainer, Josephine Grey, Chief John Hagarty.

While a panel discussion about basic income was happening in Lindsay last Friday, there was a three-hour line-up to sign up for basic income at the Lindsay Public Library – a line that spilled out onto the street.

The parallel events show there is great community support for the Ontario Basic Income Pilot, certainly from an growing number of ‘average citizens’ who are increasingly made up of the so-called working poor. These working poor are tired of a corporatist world that demands austerity from the people and yet retention of benefits for a privileged minority – and their numbers are rightly growing.

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