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Need work? Most top 10 hard skills could be learned in Kawartha Region

in Business/Community/Education/Poverty Reduction by
About 44.3 per cent of residents in Kawartha Lakes have just their high school diploma or less education.

A new study breaks down 10 “highly sought hard skills” in the Kawartha Lakes region – and Fleming College can teach most of them.

With Kawartha Lakes grappling with a high unemployment rate and low wages, this first-ever report of its kind shows a potential path forward for many who live in this area– if they get the right education and skills.

The report was produced by the Workforce Development Board (WDB) under the Local Employment Planning Council (LEPC) pilot. The report covers employment aspects related to Kawartha Lakes, Northumberland County, Peterborough County and Haliburton County. In our last article on this theme we focused on the job and income challenges in Kawartha Lakes.

Since the report also talked about the hard skills that were needed, the Advocate contacted Fleming College to find out how many of these hard skills could be matched up though local post-secondary education opportunities.

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New figures show living wage in Kawartha Lakes is $18.42 per hour

in Business/Community/Poverty Reduction by
Local health officials say the gap is “worrisome” at a time when well-paying, full-time jobs continue to decline. Photo: Jerry Holder.

As the PC government puts the brakes on the minimum wage, new figures just released show that a living wage in Kawartha Lakes for a family of four is more than $4 higher than Ontario’s current minimum wage. 

Local health officials say the gap is “worrisome” at a time when well-paying, full-time jobs continue to decline, and part-time employment can be unstable and unpredictable. 

New calculations from the Ontario Living Wage Network (www.ontariolivingwage.ca) show a family of four in Kawartha Lakes – with both parents working full-time – would each have to earn a living wage of $18.42 per hour in order to cover basic expenses in 2018. It is the highest in Ontario after Toronto and Haliburton. Keep Reading

Your own network might be your best friend for job seeking

in Columnists/Community by

So, your resume is done, you have a realistic job goal and you are ready to begin your job search. Now what do you do? Many people start by checking online job boards and newspaper ads.

It may be a good start but not always the most effective or time efficient. Remember that the more time you spend on your job search the more successful you will be.

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New study shows major job and income challenges for City of Kawartha Lakes

in Business/Community/Local News/Poverty Reduction by
New study shows major job and income challenges for Kawartha Lakes
The greatest number of job postings available during this time span were low-paying, low-skill jobs, mostly related to sales and service occupations.

Individual income from employment is a full 22 per cent below the provincial average in Kawartha Lakes, according to the first ever Community Labour Market Plan.

As well, the average income in City of Kawartha Lakes was $37,242 in 2016 — an increase of just $369 per year since 2010, despite the rapid rise in costs associated with housing, food, utilities and other inflationary pressures that far outweighs the minor gain.

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Canada Post workers on strike for 24 hours; Union wants return of postal banks

in Around Town/Community/Local News/Poverty Reduction by
Postal banking was something Canada Post did decades earlier, ending the practice in 1968. Photo: Roderick Benns.

Scores of local postal workers walked off the job this morning in Lindsay and Bobcaygeon for 24 hours in a coordinated effort to draw attention to what has become a protracted strike. Calling for better health and safety conditions, gender equality, and a return to postal banking, Cheryl MacMillan, the president of the Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) Local 564, says workers are “overburdened.”

“Parcel delivery has exploded,” she tells the Advocate, with carriers often working 10-12 hour days to finish up their deliveries. While they are paid for this, it is a forced overtime and it’s taking its toll on workers’ health, she says.

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For the Record: What did Laurie do? (Oct. 24)

in For the Record by

A special mid-week edition of For The Record, since MPP and Minister of Labour Laurie Scott has been extremely busy and focused on the elimination of Bill 148.  The PCS are replacing  the previous Liberal government’s personal emergency-leave rules. Now workers will be able to take up to three days for personal illness, two for bereavement and three for family responsibilities — all unpaid. (Currently the rules allowed employees to take up to 10 personal emergency-leave days a year, with two of them paid.)  There is a strong look at the highlighted changes here.

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For the record: What did Laurie/Jamie do? (Oct. 19, 2018)

in For the Record by
Laurie Scott: 'We have said time and time again that Ontario is open for business.'

A relatively calm week for local federal MP Jamie Schmale, especially considering the House was in session this week. Conservatives this week, on mass, decided to focus primarily on Mark Norman who is alleged to have leaked government secrets to Quebec-based Davie Shipbuilding. Schmale included some focus as well on the Trans Mountain Pipeline during an appearance on CPAC.

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For the record: What did Laurie/Jamie do? (Oct. 5, 2018)

in For the Record by
For the record: What did Laurie/Jamie do? (Oct. 5, 2018)

Local MP Jamie Schmale spent the weekend making publics appearances including at the Bobcaygeon Fair (Sept 29), TD Bank Tree Planting Day in Minden (Sept 30) and the Sunderland Legion Veterans Day Dinner (Sept 30). He helped celebrate the opening of the new viewing platform at Ken Reid Conservation Area (Oct 1).  Schmale appeared with members of the Kents and the Strumbellas at the Music Canada Cares 3R instrument drive in Lindsay (Oct 2).

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New book on basic income should be required reading: Review

in Community/Education/Poverty Reduction by

Once in a while a mainstream public policy book comes along that has the potential to be a game changer of information, analysis, and sound reasoning. Even rarer is when that same book can strike a warm and inviting tone, beckoning the reader into what feels like a private discussion.

Basic Income for Canadians: The Key to a Healthier, Happier, More Secure Life for All (published by Lorimer) should not be private, though – it should be required reading for every federal and provincial bureaucrat, every municipal politician, and every business owner. It should be on the must-read list for every Canadian who has even the slightest interest in where our nation is headed, and where it could be.

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Senator Art Eggleton: Will Lindsay be the next Dauphin, Manitoba?

in Around Town/Community/Poverty Reduction by

One of Canada’s most well-known inequality fighters, Senator Art Eggleton, inspired members of the Ontario Basic Income Network recently who were in Lindsay for their annual general meeting.

In his opening remarks, Eggleton wondered aloud if Lindsay would become known as “the Dauphin, Manitoba of this decade.”

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