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Kawartha Lakes

Making ‘career resolutions’ is great to consider

in Business/Columnists/Community by

As we begin 2019 it’s common to hear talk of New Year’s resolutions. But do you make resolutions about your career each year? Maybe this is something you should consider.

Updating your career goal isn’t something only the unemployed should consider. It could involve looking for new work, but it can just as easily mean looking at a promotion or a new opportunity within the same company. If you take part in an annual performance appraisal you may be asked about your future career aspirations.

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For women experiencing domestic abuse, pets often used as cruel leverage

in Community by

More than half of women delay leaving an abusive partner because of concerns for their pets, according to research from the University of Windsor.

Dr. Amy Fitzgerald, who released her research in 2017, also found a shocking 89 per cent of domestic violence cases that also involve some type of animal abuse.

Women’s Resources, serving the City of Kawartha Lakes, has been working hard to solve the barriers for women who need to leave an abuser. Since 1992, they have had 32,454 crisis calls and the Victoria’s Shelter Program has supported 2,537 women and 2,180 children. Now they are working with PAWs and Company to help solve the challenge facing women who need to leave an abusive situation, but have pets.

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Growing hope for the New Year

in Columnists/Community/Health by

I am increasingly being asked to speak to people about hope. This is not surprising. Given the decline of the insects that are drivers of our food system, the loss of the birds that keep dangerous insects in check, and the fact that it will soon be too hot for our food to germinate and grow, we are really in need of some hope. If the conversation has truly shifted from climate change to climate catastrophe, how can we possibly live in hope? In the face of so much death, where is hope found?

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Quarter of basic income recipients spent time volunteering: Survey

in Community/Poverty Reduction by

OBIP Chronicles — A quarter of the people who were collecting basic income chose to volunteer at least some of their time, once they felt more financially stable, according to a survey about the Ontario Basis Income Pilot.

Proponents of a basic income have long maintained that when people have a financial foundation they are more likely to give of their time to others.

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Housing and homelessness plan review, update and survey

in Community/Local News/Poverty Reduction by

Provincial legislation has established the City responsible for the administration of housing and homelessness programs and services for both the City of Kawartha Lakes and the County of Haliburton. In this capacity, the City is called the Service Manager. The province requires Service Managers to develop a 10-year Housing and Homelessness Plan (“the Plan”). The Plan establishes priorities for housing and homelessness services based on targeted consultations and research.

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More than a third of basic income recipients went back to school: Survey

in Community/Education/Health/Poverty Reduction by
“I am forever grateful I was chosen to be a recipient, and I wish that one day all countries would adopt this method of caring for those who have less income."

OBIP Chronicles – More than 33 per cent of respondents to a survey about the Ontario Basis Income Pilot were going back to school to further their education.

Jenna, a woman in her 40s, says her partner was able to go back to school and their son was able to participate in activities that helps with his motor disorder.

“My partner felt previous problems returning,” after the basic income pilot’s cancellation she says in the survey. “We only received a very small amount of money, comparatively, but it made a huge difference.”

More than 1,500 of the 4,000 basic income pilot recipients agreed to help the Basic Income Canada Network and the Ontario Basic Income Network continue working for a basic income. BICN conducted a survey of those people. Well over 400 responses have already come back, representing more than 10 per cent of those receiving basic income in Ontario, allowing us to write this special series. The Lindsay Advocate, working in cooperation with BICN, is pleased to be the media partner highlighting these stories. Names have been changed to protect identities.

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Need for carpenters rising in Kawartha Lakes — just ask Madeline Carey

in Around Town/Business/Community by

If StatsCan and the Peterborough Workforce Development Board are correct, kids entering high school this year and hoping to live and work in the City of Kawartha Lakes after graduation would be wise to choose trades — especially construction technology as an elective course. The PWDB projects that the City of Kawartha Lakes will see a 39 per cent increase in demand for carpenters between 2017 and 2024. That is the largest increase shown among surveyed occupations, surpassing elementary school teachers (5 per cent), truck drivers (18 per cent), and even sales representatives (27 per cent).

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Nesbitt’s Meat Market: Hayward’s hard work ethic reflects success of downtown business

in Business/Business Profiles/Community by
Adam Hayward.

The sign reads “Nesbitt’s Meat Market,” but though Jim Nesbitt still drops in for a chat on Saturday mornings, for the past 19 years it’s Adam Hayward who has owned and operated the business. And it was over 30 years ago that Hayward, at 13, began working part-time there as a ‘clean-up lad.’

Through high-school and as he completed a butchery program at George Brown College and business management at Humber, Hayward took on additional responsibilities and gained skills in cutting and grinding and running a business.

“Jim Nesbitt was a great mentor and friend who still helps me to this day,” says Hayward. Beyond the technical skills, the lessons that stayed with Hayward were to work hard, treat customers and employees with respect, and offer a quality product at a fair price.

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The thrill of the festive hunt: Your guide to bazaar season

in Around Town/Community/Local News/Seniors by

Starting in mid-November, every weekend offers you the chance to pick up unique finds that are locally made, reasonably priced and usually support a great cause. That’s the beauty of Christmas bazaar season. Watch for signs outside churches, charities and nursing homes starting in mid-November.

Pro tip: Bring several of your own reusable containers for cookies and other baking, and cloth bags for larger purchases. And remember, like any other shopping expedition, it’s easy to get carried away—there are definitely better and worse choices.

Best bets

You’re looking for things you can’t get anywhere else, or that you can’t or won’t make yourself. Keep an eye out for:

-microwaveable rice- or bean-filled neck bags. These are often available at bazaars in much cheaper and more attractive versions than you’ll find in stores.

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Kinmount and Area Food Bank now open; seniors as clients on the rise in province

in Around Town/Community/Local News/Poverty Reduction/Seniors by

The Kinmount and Area Food Bank will officially open to the public Dec. 13, serving 45 families.

According to Kinmount and Area Food Bank Chair Grace MacDonald, it will be open every other Thursday, based on a schedule that alternates with the Coboconk Food Bank and will “serve 45 families who were using either the Coboconk or Minden Food Bank,” says MacDonald.

MacDonald chairs a group of volunteers that have been working over the last year to open the much needed local resource. Finding local sponsors, a location that had a health board-certified kitchen and getting police checks completed were just some of the things that MacDonald and her committee had to accomplish in order to open. In the end the group decided on the Kinmount Baptist Church (4937 Monk Rd., Kinmount.)

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