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New study shows major job and income challenges for City of Kawartha Lakes

in Business/Community/Local News/Poverty Reduction by
New study shows major job and income challenges for Kawartha Lakes
The greatest number of job postings available during this time span were low-paying, low-skill jobs, mostly related to sales and service occupations.

Individual income from employment is a full 22 per cent below the provincial average in Kawartha Lakes, according to the first ever Community Labour Market Plan.

As well, the average income in City of Kawartha Lakes was $37,242 in 2016 — an increase of just $369 per year since 2010, despite the rapid rise in costs associated with housing, food, utilities and other inflationary pressures that far outweighs the minor gain.

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Teachers matter: Educators help create resilience

in Community/Education by
A challenging home life can be eased through strong teacher and school support.

When we thought about our daughter going to Grade 7 this fall — at a new school in a new town — we had many concerns and hopes, but none were about the curriculum. The PC government’s attack on teachers and the threat to add a snitch line seems so petty. Teachers aren’t employed by the Province in the first place and the Ontario College of Teachers requires accountability and a professional level of standard — and boards are in place to monitor necessary levels of conduct.

Our concerns were typical parental concerns. Will she make friends? How will she adapt to having more than one teacher each day?

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New TLDSB superintendent of business services

in Education by

Trillium Lakelands District School Board (TLDSB) trustees approved the appointment of Tim Ellis as the board’s new superintendent of business services, replacing Bob Kaye who will be retiring after working for 28 years with the board.

Ellis will be responsible for system fiscal management and accountability, as well as leadership of facility and transportation departments.

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EQAO results show local students struggling, especially Grade 3

in Community/Education by
EQAO results show students struggling, especially Grade 3

Local Grade 3 EQAO results from the Education Quality and Assessment Office (EQAO) show a drop in all three assessment areas — reading, writing, and math. Reading and writing results in Grade 6 are holding steady, indicating a slight decline of one per cent in math, just as the provincial results also dropped by one per cent in Grade 6 math.

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Board finds needed $2 million in estimated teacher sick leave

in Community/Education by
TLDSB Director of Education Larry Hope has reached out to local unions for support.

As the Trillium Lakelands District School Board grapples with a $2 million funding shortfall in expected revenues, it found the solution in decreasing the amount of money it is allocating for teacher sick leave.

Director of Education Larry Hope just hopes it wasn’t a one-time solution, and so has reached out to the local union presidents for support.

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Parents: Pinnguaq providing free coding classes at library all summer

in Around Town/Community/Education by
Parents: Pinnguaq providing free coding classes at library all summer
Kevin Karyak and Jasper Pootoogook work during a teach session in Baker Lake, Nunavut, March 2017.

Want to give your child knowledge of coding? Lindsay’s Pinnguaq Association is offering free coding classes at the Lindsay Public Library this summer.

Pinnguaq was created as a not-for-profit, Pangnirtung, Nunavut-based technology company with a desire to see strong programming education available in Inuktitut, the Inuit language. Their te(a)ch program is a made-in-Nunavut curriculum and learning series for Northerners. Pinnguaq has an office in Lindsay, though, and is looking to give back to the community with their work.

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Teacher says ‘travel is the only thing that makes you richer’ as students prepare for Normandy

in Community/Education by
From L to R: Shaun Soutar, Alison Smith, Emma Bartley, Reece Eason, Rebecca James

Several students gathered over a free lunch at Fenelon Falls Secondary School recently to enthusiastically discuss a 10-day trip to Normandy next year – and they got a chance to network with students who have already travelled internationally.

Julie Rocheleau, a teacher at the high school, has been organizing these international trips with her students for several years.

Rocheleau says, “I’ve been taking kids out-of-country pretty much every year since I started teaching, whether it be for sports or an immersive experience. Travel is the only thing that makes you richer.”

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Students of today, citizens of tomorrow: Graduation rites of passage

in Just in Time by

It’s an annual ritual that occurs in the last week or so of June. Families and friends crowd into a hot auditorium and take their seats in front of a stage gaily decorated in floral blooms, the national and provincial flags, and the time-honoured school colours of red, blue, and old gold.

While the assembled multitude fan themselves with programs distributed at the auditorium door by student ushers, a long procession is forming in the hallway just beyond “the four corners.” Grade 12 students have donned dark blue robes and are being carefully marshalled into formation.

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Fleming president says college tries to stay on top of skills employers need

in Business/Education by
Fleming president says college tries to stay on top of skills employers need
Fleming wants to address Lindsay's skills shortage.

One of the key challenges for Lindsay and Kawartha Lakes is the growing skills shortage. It’s affecting area employers who can’t find the right people, and of course it’s not good for the people who can’t find the right job.

Sir Sandford Fleming College President, Tony Tilly, is aware of the skills shortage phenomenon affecting Lindsay and other small towns that have seen their manufacturing base shrink.

“We’ve been aware of this issue for a number of years,” Tilly says, pointing out that the college system commissioned a report in 2010 entitled ‘People Without Jobs, Jobs Without People.’

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Every employee has mental health; how’s yours?

in Columnists/Health by
Every employee has mental health; how's yours?
Jack Veitch, CMHA.

The average Canadian spends roughly 40 hours per week at work. Those days are often spent filing, lifting, sweating, serving or teaching. Some may enjoy their work; others may spend their work days dreaming of how they’ll spend their downtime.

What every employee has in common though is that each and every one of them has mental health. Everyone has mental health. A spectrum that flows fluidly from being mentally healthy, to even potentially mentally ill. While we all live with that mental health spectrum, approximately one in five will experience mental distress in a given year.

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