News. Community. Wellness.

More than half of people on basic income behind on bills for two or more months

in Poverty Reduction by

It’s perhaps no surprise that the men and women who were collecting basic income across Lindsay, Thunder Bay, and Hamilton area were in financially challenging circumstances.

Data from the baseline survey shows how difficult their situation actually was. The average share of income spent on shelter was more than 55 per cent, while more than 43 per cent of participants reported they were falling behind in meeting their basic financial obligations.

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Barbara Doyle chosen as federal NDP candidate

in Community by

Barbara Doyle has been chosen to represent the NDP in Haliburton Kawartha Lakes Brock for the next federal election. She was one of two candidates, topping local union leader James Mulhern.

Doyle is focusing on a platform that fights for “change and progress in areas of affordable housing, universal Pharmacare, justice reforms, skilled trades and implementing robust climate policies that include fighting for an aggressive transition to green alternatives and moving away from carbon-intensive industries while also addressing limiting trade policies that go against Canadian interests,” according to a press release.

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Troubled bridge over water in Fenelon Falls

in Opinion by
Kawartha Lakes Country Living Show

This Just In: A government-appointed official reported that there was “a great deal of dissatisfaction being expressed at Fenelon Falls” over progress on the bridge.

That may sound current, but it’s actually a report from 1887. And that’s not a typo: 18-87. It seems that figuring the best way (and the number of ways) over the Fenelon River is just part of the Fenelon DNA, perhaps as integral to a Fenelonite as as our perpetual rivalry with Bobcaygeon.

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Seeing examples of integrity in local politics

in Opinion by
Councillor Andrew Veale, foreground; Councillor Kathleen Seymour-Fagan, background.

With power (great or otherwise) comes responsibility and a potential for abuse. Over the past week Kawartha Lakes Council has taken significant measures to guide, support, and enforce ethical behaviour in municipal politics. It’s also, in a decision on disposal of surplus parkland, shown us what ethical conduct looks like.

Committees/ Boards/ Task Forces

In closed session at Tuesday’s meeting council approved citizen appointments to three committees (Airport Advisory, Waste Management, and Downtown Revitalization) a board (Drainage) and a task force (Development Charges).  

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Kawartha Lakes budget holds tax increase to 2.85 per cent

in Community/Local News by
Kawartha Lakes City Council.

The 4.5 per cent tax levy increase forecast in the City’s Long Range Financial Plan for 2019 was whittled down to 2.85 per cent, largely the result of decisions not to fund purchase of an aerial ladder fire truck and to reduce contribution to the capital reserve.  

A budget process that began last September with the presentation of a draft to the previous council wound up yesterday being approved unanimously.

As Jennifer Stover, director of corporate services, pointed out with some satisfaction, the overall reduction in tax levy was accomplished without any reduction in service levels and while supporting the City’s largest capital program to date.

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The limits of church, the duty of state

in Opinion/Poverty Reduction/Seniors by

“When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist.”  — Dom Helder Camara

When we broke the story about many seniors who are falling through the cracks, some spoke up to say this would be a great project for churches to take on. We disagree entirely and are happy to see Kawartha Lakes Paramedic Services begin to fill this gap, thanks to funding from the City for a pilot.

First, let me say that our churches, charities, and non-profits are run by some of the finest people one could ever meet. But it is part of the neoliberal, corporate-first mindset that has normalized the idea of charity to this degree.

The first food bank in Canada opened its doors only in 1981, supposedly a temporary response to a recession. Instead, they have proliferated across Canada as inequality has widened and ordinary Canadians have suffered.

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Council steps up to fund paramedic project to support vulnerable seniors

in Community/Health/Local News/Seniors by
Paramedics noted they wanted to leverage their skills and resources to support vulnerable, isolated seniors.

Vulnerable seniors in Kawartha Lakes may get the help they need after Kawartha Lakes City Council endorsed the idea of a three-month pilot run by local paramedics.

Mayor Andy Letham brought forward the proposed project idea by Kawartha Lakes Paramedic Service today after the Local Health Integration twice turned the paramedics down for $25,000 to fund the pilot.

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Nearly half of basic income recipients were severely food insecure: Survey

in Poverty Reduction by

Nearly half of the thousands of Ontarians collecting basic income reported severe food insecurity.

In the baseline survey, 48.4 per cent reported experiencing severe food insecurity. Survey comments made to the Basic Income Canada Network indicated that the higher quality food recipients were able to purchase while on the pilot improved their lives — sometimes dramatically.

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February is Black History Month: Why it still matters

in Education by

The study of history is a revelation of the entire human experience, helping us to make connections between the past and present, and providing us with guidance for the future based on the lessons we have learned.

Marcus Garvey, one of the thinkers I studied as a child growing up in Jamaica, said that a people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots.  In a similar vein, on the other side of the Atlantic, in a 1948 speech to the British House of Commons, Winston Churchill said that those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.

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St. Thomas Aquinas takes us back to the 1980s

in Around Town/Community/Education by
Aiden Shearer stars as Corey Palmer in Back to the 80s. Photo: St. Thomas Aquinas.

The decade spanning 1980 through 1990 was significant on multiple fronts.

The world watched as the Prince of Wales wed Lady Diana Spencer (1981) and as the Berlin Wall came tumbling down (1989). Canadians cheered on Terry Fox as he began his Marathon of Hope (1980); saw their Constitution repatriated (1982); and handled $1 coins for the first time (1987). Ontarians voted out the Progressive Conservative Party after over four decades in office (1985) and watched the SkyDome’s retractable roof open to a torrential downpour (1989).  Here in Victoria County, the Town of Lindsay celebrated its 125th anniversary by painting faces on fire hydrants (1982); the indefatigable Bill Scott represented his constituents in Ottawa; and Union Carbide announced that it would cease production of film, film packaging products, and industrial garbage bags at its Lindsay plant (1989).

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