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Sir John A Macdonald: His past is our past

Sometimes when I walk by Lindsay’s iconic municipal building — our former Town Hall — I look up at that top-level balcony and imagine Sir John A. Macdonald speaking from there. Our first prime minister – whose birthday is Jan. 11 – visited Lindsay twice. The first time was as prime minister, in either 1872 or 1874 (records vary), and a second time he visited as leader of the opposition in 1877.

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C.H.E.S.T. Fund:  Christmas comes early thanks to vision of Hydro One, former mayor

in Around Town/Community/Local News by
Who is this mysterious benefactor and how did this annual gift-giving come about?

In early December each year roughly a quarter of a million dollars in grants flows from C.H.E.S.T. Fund coffers into our community. As the fund requires, the money goes to “non-profit, community-based organizations that provide programs, projects, services or activities that enhance the quality of life for residents in the areas of health, arts, culture, leisure, heritage, education and the environment.” But we all benefit.

This year the exact amount disbursed was $288,375.45. The Advocate talked to three grant recipients to learn a little more about the projects the money will make possible and the impact those projects will have.

But before hearing from them, who is this mysterious benefactor and how did this annual gift-giving come about?

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Lindsay Downtown BIA sparks successful ‘shop local’ holiday passport program

in Around Town/Business/Community/Local News by
Melissa McFarland and Charlie McDonald of the Lindsay Downtown BIA.

On November 16, 2018, the Lindsay Downtown BIA launched the Holiday Passport program, to encourage both the local community and visitors to take advantage of everything downtown Lindsay has to offer during the holiday season.

Running for six weeks, the program drew to a close on December 20, with a draw for massive gift baskets. In the weeks before, the Lindsay Downtown BIA’s marketing committee pounded the downtown sidewalks, pitching the idea to the local merchants, who almost unanimously supported the idea.

Each merchant was provided with a stack of blank passports and a unique stamp, and the promotion kicked off the weekend of the Santa Claus parade – the unofficial start to the holiday season. Instantly appealing to the local residents, the passport provided an incentive for shopping local during the holiday season.

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Housing and homelessness plan review, update and survey

in Community/Local News/Poverty Reduction by

Provincial legislation has established the City responsible for the administration of housing and homelessness programs and services for both the City of Kawartha Lakes and the County of Haliburton. In this capacity, the City is called the Service Manager. The province requires Service Managers to develop a 10-year Housing and Homelessness Plan (“the Plan”). The Plan establishes priorities for housing and homelessness services based on targeted consultations and research.

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More than a third of basic income recipients went back to school: Survey

in Community/Education/Health/Poverty Reduction by
“I am forever grateful I was chosen to be a recipient, and I wish that one day all countries would adopt this method of caring for those who have less income."

OBIP Chronicles – More than 33 per cent of respondents to a survey about the Ontario Basis Income Pilot were going back to school to further their education.

Jenna, a woman in her 40s, says her partner was able to go back to school and their son was able to participate in activities that helps with his motor disorder.

“My partner felt previous problems returning,” after the basic income pilot’s cancellation she says in the survey. “We only received a very small amount of money, comparatively, but it made a huge difference.”

More than 1,500 of the 4,000 basic income pilot recipients agreed to help the Basic Income Canada Network and the Ontario Basic Income Network continue working for a basic income. BICN conducted a survey of those people. Well over 400 responses have already come back, representing more than 10 per cent of those receiving basic income in Ontario, allowing us to write this special series. The Lindsay Advocate, working in cooperation with BICN, is pleased to be the media partner highlighting these stories. Names have been changed to protect identities.

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Need for carpenters rising in Kawartha Lakes — just ask Madeline Carey

in Around Town/Business/Community by

If StatsCan and the Peterborough Workforce Development Board are correct, kids entering high school this year and hoping to live and work in the City of Kawartha Lakes after graduation would be wise to choose trades — especially construction technology as an elective course. The PWDB projects that the City of Kawartha Lakes will see a 39 per cent increase in demand for carpenters between 2017 and 2024. That is the largest increase shown among surveyed occupations, surpassing elementary school teachers (5 per cent), truck drivers (18 per cent), and even sales representatives (27 per cent).

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Dr. Bert Lauwers stepping down as Ross Memorial’s President & CEO

in Community/Health by

After four years at the helm, Dr. Bert Lauwers is stepping down from his position as president and CEO at the Ross Memorial Hospital in early 2019. Dr. Lauwers will take on the new role of executive vice president of medical and clinical programs at the Scarborough Health Network on April 1, 2019.

The Ross Memorial Hospital Board of Governors is sincerely grateful to Dr. Lauwers for his years of exceptional leadership and for his commitment to quality and patient safety at the Ross Memorial Hospital.

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Meals on Wheels may be the only social interaction some have on Christmas Day

in Community/Health/Poverty Reduction/Seniors by
Art Myers, left, and Len Skelton, right, volunteers for Meals on Wheels.

It’s the time of year when we look ahead just a few weeks to the Christmas season. For many people, it’s a ‘warm and fuzzy’ exercise as they anticipate family gatherings and meals accented with laughter, merriment and reflections of their blessings. It’s not necessarily so for everyone, however.

As much as the holiday season can be heartwarming and positive for some, it also a very ‘blue’ time for others who may be without family and friends. Stress of the holidays can combine with circumstances that trigger sadness and melancholy instead of happiness and positive moods. Not everybody looks forward to the holidays, especially if it means being alone.

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Christmas at the Ross: Dedication of front-line staff shines through

in Around Town/Community/Health/Local News by

Last year on Christmas Day, there were 152 patients in the Ross Memorial Hospital, including 35 in continuing care, 15 in rehabilitation, 12 in mental health, 88 in acute care and 2 newborns. And 17 people were admitted into the Ross on that day. As on most any other day at any hospital, there were heart-wrenching stories too: Sadly, two patients passed away that same day.

To care for all of these people and their visiting families, 189 people worked at the Ross last Christmas Day.

Think about that. That’s 189 families in our community whose Christmas’ have been changed or in some cases delayed so that another 152 families in our community can be cared for. And that number does not include volunteers — who donate their time and labour to make Christmas at the Ross a little brighter.

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The spirit of the season: What is it, and how do we make it last?

in Community by
What would happen if, as a reformed Scrooge promises, we kept Christmas in our hearts all the year?

Maybe you’re hearing it already. Maybe you’ve said it yourself. But what do we really mean when we say things like “getting into the Christmas spirit” or “the true spirit of the season”? What exactly is this thing that we all profess to desire not just now, but all year long?

Although it’s not precisely religious, it is something that transcends the ordinary, says Rev. Linda Park, lead minister at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church in Lindsay. “I think it’s a longing for a sense of generosity, a sense of family, a sense of community.”

When people use the phrase, what they’re identifying is “a spirit of giving, a spirit of feeling at one, of reaching out beyond themselves,” often mingled with nostalgia, suggests Rev. Craig Donnelly, minister at Cambridge Street United Church.

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Basic Income at Christmas was making life a bit more worth living

in Community/Health/Local News/Poverty Reduction by

OBIP Chronicles — As we approach the holidays, many people who are receiving basic income are, for the first time in a long time, able to buy gifts for loved ones or can afford to do activities with their kids.

Giving is not only good for the soul, as the saying goes, but also one’s physical and emotional health. The evidence is unassailable.

  • In his book Why Good Things Happen to Good People, Stephen Post, a professor of preventative medicine at Stony Brook University in the U.S., reports that giving to others can enhance health benefits in people who are coping with a chronic illness.
  • In a 2006 study by Rachel Piferi of Johns Hopkins University and Kathleen Lawler of the University of Tennessee, giving was shown to even improve physical health and longevity because it decreases stress. People who provided social support to others had lower blood pressure than those in the study who didn’t, suggesting a direct physiological benefit to the power of giving.
  • Generosity is likely to be rewarded by others eventually, sometimes by the person you chose to give to, and sometimes by someone else. Several studies, including work by sociologists Brent Simpson and Robb Willer, have suggested that these exchanges promote a sense of trust and cooperation that strengthens our ties to others. In turn, these strengthened ties have been shown in research to spark positive social interactions, so imperative to good mental and physical health.

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