News. Community. Wellness.

Opinion

Teachers: For the people

In the mid 1990s, while working at a newspaper as a young scribe, I wrote what I thought was a great story about a teacher who was taking a sabbatical. He was going to visit an overseas country and increase his learning and experience. He would inevitably accumulate new wisdom to bring back to future students one day.

Except that particular story never ran. I was told to get the ‘real’ story. How much was this going to cost? What sort of burden would this be to ‘taxpayers?’ The headline was altered, the focus shifted. In the end, the teacher and board of education were meant to feel shame for allowing such a thing to happen. I was embarrassed to see my name on that byline.

Keep Reading

Food choking incident at local school has parents demanding more supervision

in Education by
Neil and Jena-Lyn Westerby with their children.

A Lindsay couple whose daughter choked on food at Leslie Frost Public School while there was no adult in the classroom is fighting for more supervision for students.

Meanwhile, a Trillium Lakelands District School Board spokesperson says “students are not left alone unsupervised.”

Neil and Jena-Lyn Westerby say their daughter Lexie, 7, choked on a piece of orange on March 22 which upset her enough that she wanted to call home. She was not allowed to call home, the parents say, although the teacher did notify the parents via a text message after the school day and after Lexie had already told her parents about what had happened.

Keep Reading

Water in plastic: Who’s most responsible in the drive for endless growth?

in Environment/Opinion by
Water in plastic: Who’s most responsible in the drive for endless growth?

It was a peaceful climate justice protest organized by a high school student inspired by activist Greta Thunberg. A man approached us to say he fully supported what we were doing; and in the next breath said he hoped we didn’t think the carbon tax was going to make a difference. A fellow protester asked him what approach we should take: “Reduce, reuse and recycle. Just like we’ve always done.” Our visitor then jumped into his car and drove away.

Keep Reading

A bug’s life: Braden Evans’ fascination with insects passed on to Fleming students

in Community by

It was a pie chart he was shown as an undergraduate biology student at Guelph that convinced Braden Evans he should focus on insects. The chart showed all animal species. The tiniest of slivers represented the 5,416 species of mammals; another sliver showed the 10,000 species of birds. Most of the pie? Insects. Close to a million species.

Insects, he learned, were everywhere, equipped to occupy every conceivable ecological niche by an astounding variety of adaptations.

Which is the perfect segue . . . because Braden himself has found a niche for which he is perfectly adapted: teaching in Fleming College’s Ecosystems Management Program.

Keep Reading

City launching Multi-Unit Rehabilitation Housing Program

in Business by
City receives $5.6 million in one-time funding from Province, Feds

In partnership with the municipality’s Million Dollar Makeover program, Housing Help is launching a Multi-Unit Rehabilitation Program for residents in Kawartha Lakes. To apply before the deadline of July 5, 2019, visit the Housing Help website.

“We’re so excited to launch the Multi-Unit Rehabilitation Program with Million Dollar Makeover,” said Hope Lee, Manager of Human Services-Housing. “This program operates through forgivable loans, which means that those who participate are able to create a safe and affordable home. This program works toward Kawartha Lakes’ goal of increasing affordable housing in our municipality.”

Keep Reading

Lindsay’s Pinnguaq wins Smart Cities Challenge $10 million prize

in Business/Community by
Lindsay’s Pinnguaq wins Smart Cities Challenge $10 million prize
Pinnguaq has grown to act as the major provider of technological education and digital exposure in Nunavut.

Lindsay’s Pinnguaq Association, in collaboration with the Nunavut Association of Municipalities (NAM), and the Embrace Life Council and Qaujigiartiit Health Research, has won one of two $10 million prizes through the Canadian government’s Smart Cities Challenge.

The Advocate caught up with Ryan Oliver, director of Pinnguaq, shortly after their prize was accepted in Ottawa. Would there be any benefit to Lindsay and area as well, we wanted to know.

Keep Reading

Summer in Fenelon Falls looks to be exciting in 2019

in Around Town/Community by
Summer in Fenelon Falls looks to be exciting in 2019
Fenelon Falls will be a busy place this summer. Photo: Geoff Coleman.

What’s going on in Fenelon Falls this summer? What’s not going might be a better question.

June 8 sees the Kawartha Yarn and Fibre Festival return to the village after a wildly successful inaugural year that saw more than 1,000 attendees at the one day show. Moving to bigger digs at the Fenelon Falls Community Centre, the Festival provides a showcase for small businesses and farms to connect directly with artisans and makers who are passionate about their work. For 2019, they offer an expanded selection of 80 vendors and 20 classes.

Keep Reading

Kawartha Lakes reviews long term plan for arenas

in Municipal by

At an evening Committee of the Whole meeting on May 9 at the Little Britain Arena and Community Centre, Council considered the long term plan for arena capital requirements.

Craig Shanks, Director of Community Services, recapped staff recommendations to Council that include $11.7 million of capital investment over the next 10 years. All costs have been included in the municipality’s long-term financial plan.

Keep Reading

Blame Wynne for some of the doctor shortages Kawartha Lakes is facing

in Community/Health by
Blame Wynne for some of the doctor shortages that Kawartha Lakes facing

The family doctor shortage in Kawartha Lakes, and the rest of the country, might not be so bad today if the previous provincial Liberal government had done things differently in 2015.

In Ontario, after a medical student graduates, they don’t immediately start a practice. First, they must complete a residency where they train with established physicians for at least two years and up to four years depending on the discipline.

Keep Reading

Kawartha Lakes Health Coalition wonders why Ross making key structural changes

in Health by
The Kawartha Lakes Health Coalition is looking for more community involvement on hospital changes.

From the Kawartha Lakes Health Coalition

On April 18 this year The Ross Memorial Hospital (RMH) posted a notice in the legal section of the weekly Metroland corporate newspaper. The notice stated that the hospital will apply to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario to enact special legislation to change its  name to “Ross Memorial Hospital” (dropping “the”), as well as “change its objects, its powers, the composition of its board and membership, and to repeal certain existing Acts.”

Keep Reading

Game on! Wards Lawyers Kids’ Road Hockey Tournament might be Canada’s biggest

in Community/Health by
This just might be the nation’s largest kids’ road hockey tournament.

What could be more Canadian than a road hockey game? Well, how about a tournament with no fewer than 12 road hockey rinks and games running all day?

The Wards Lawyers Kids’ Road Hockey Tournament in support of youth mental health is set for Sunday, May 26. According to lawyer and organizer Jason Ward it will probably be the nation’s largest kids’ road hockey tournament.

All that will be missing when it gets underway at 8 am will be game-pausing cries of “Car!” (Kent Street, from Cambridge to York, will be closed to traffic for the event.)

Keep Reading

Go to Top