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Kawartha Lakes pleased with proposed changes to Ontario’s Growth Plan

On January 15, the province released proposed changes to the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, a key document that governs growth within the municipality of Kawartha Lakes.

City staff and Mayor Andy Letham have been involved in ongoing consultation with Hon. Steve Clark, Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing and his staff. In August 2018, Letham and partners from Northumberland and Peterborough County led a delegation at the Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO) conference in Ottawa to put forward local concerns. Other meetings and discussions have taken place throughout the last several months.

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Save community banks, save the post office: Time for postal banking in Canada

in Business/Columnists/Community/Poverty Reduction/Seniors by
The big banks are getting out of smaller communities. Is it time for postal banking?

One of the first things that the new Dominion of Canada did as a country, way back in April 1868, was create a postal bank. The idea was to create a banking system that everyday Canadians could access easily – and to serve customers that the established banks at the time showed little interest in serving. Postal banking existed in Canada until 1968.

All of the stakeholders of the postal system (Canada Post; Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) and the Canadian Postmasters and Assistants Association (CPAA) have examined the idea of re-establishing a postal bank. The CUPW and CPAA research relies heavily on the research of consultant John Anderson. His 82-page Why Canada Needs Postal Banking published by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives contains some of the most detailed research on the topic.

Make no mistake: this is research funded by CUPW. And let’s face it: CUPW are a bit of a polarizing entity at the moment. So it’s perhaps not the most strategic time to be advocating for an increased role and more responsibilities for Canada Post — and its workers — in our life. The most recent strike no doubt rankled many of us, especially those of us waiting for Christmas gifts ordered online. And we are about to get another postage increase. On Jan. 14, 2019 a stamp bought in bulk will cost 90 cents. An individual stamp will cost us $1.05. That we can — in a time of $7 coffees — mail a letter from anywhere in Canada to anywhere in Canada for a measly $1.05 will be lost on those who use any excuse to bash Canada Post. I mean $1.05! That’s a whole nickel more than a non-existent buck-a-beer! But I digress.

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Tourist town: To close or not to close in Fenelon Falls

in Business/Community by

When the Fenelon Falls business that has survived the longest in one location, under the same ownership first opened, the Cow and Sow Eatery’s Dickon Robinson was repeatedly asked a seemingly simple question: “Are you going to stay open all year?”

Residents had learned that restaurants in the tourist town did not always operate year-round, even if they didn’t really know why. Robinson chose to stay open all year, and 22 years later he still operates 364 days, but the bottom line is not his only motivation.

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For women experiencing domestic abuse, pets often used as cruel leverage

in Community by

More than half of women delay leaving an abusive partner because of concerns for their pets, according to research from the University of Windsor.

Dr. Amy Fitzgerald, who released her research in 2017, also found a shocking 89 per cent of domestic violence cases that also involve some type of animal abuse.

Women’s Resources, serving the City of Kawartha Lakes, has been working hard to solve the barriers for women who need to leave an abuser. Since 1992, they have had 32,454 crisis calls and the Victoria’s Shelter Program has supported 2,537 women and 2,180 children. Now they are working with PAWs and Company to help solve the challenge facing women who need to leave an abusive situation, but have pets.

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Growing hope for the New Year

in Columnists/Community/Health by

I am increasingly being asked to speak to people about hope. This is not surprising. Given the decline of the insects that are drivers of our food system, the loss of the birds that keep dangerous insects in check, and the fact that it will soon be too hot for our food to germinate and grow, we are really in need of some hope. If the conversation has truly shifted from climate change to climate catastrophe, how can we possibly live in hope? In the face of so much death, where is hope found?

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Quarter of basic income recipients spent time volunteering: Survey

in Community/Poverty Reduction by

OBIP Chronicles — A quarter of the people who were collecting basic income chose to volunteer at least some of their time, once they felt more financially stable, according to a survey about the Ontario Basis Income Pilot.

Proponents of a basic income have long maintained that when people have a financial foundation they are more likely to give of their time to others.

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Seniors in crisis in Kawartha Lakes: Group calls on Mayor, MPP to help fill in the gaps

in Community/Health/Local News/Seniors by
Scores of seniors with some level of cognitive impairment across Kawartha Lakes are at risk of grave injury or death because there are no services for people like them.

He’s got a makeshift wood stove in a dilapidated trailer outside of town. She’s hoarding junk and debris — so much in fact that the doors to her home no longer open and parts of her floor are sagging. Another man burns flammable liquids to stay warm during the cold clutch of winter. In her postcard-perfect home, another woman constantly calls police to investigate phantom intruders.

This is but a snapshot of a growing number of seniors who are in danger in our community. They’re all over age 60 and most have lost at least some of their cognitive abilities. These are men and women who are not necessarily defined by poverty or rural postal codes. In fact, many of them live in nice homes in Lindsay or elsewhere in Kawartha Lakes and may be quite well off.

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So you want to be a municipal councillor?

in Community/Local News by
Councillor Andrew Veale, right, with Councillor Kathleen Seymour-Fagan, left.

An interview with Ward 4 Councillor Andrew Veale.

Morris: Andrew, you’re councillor for Ward 4. That’s Woodville, right?

Veale: Well, includes Woodville, but also Little Britain, Argyle, Valentia, Oakwood, and parts of Seagrave. Ward 4 stretches from Lake Scugog north to past Palestine Road and from Simcoe Street to OpMar Road and several others on the east boundary. There are roughly 8,500 residents.

Morris: And this is your second term as a councillor?

Veale: Yes.

Morris: Cushy job, eh?  I mean, you show up for  a couple of council meetings a month then cash your cheques?

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C.H.E.S.T. Fund:  Christmas comes early thanks to vision of Hydro One, former mayor

in Around Town/Community/Local News by
Who is this mysterious benefactor and how did this annual gift-giving come about?

In early December each year roughly a quarter of a million dollars in grants flows from C.H.E.S.T. Fund coffers into our community. As the fund requires, the money goes to “non-profit, community-based organizations that provide programs, projects, services or activities that enhance the quality of life for residents in the areas of health, arts, culture, leisure, heritage, education and the environment.” But we all benefit.

This year the exact amount disbursed was $288,375.45. The Advocate talked to three grant recipients to learn a little more about the projects the money will make possible and the impact those projects will have.

But before hearing from them, who is this mysterious benefactor and how did this annual gift-giving come about?

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Lindsay Downtown BIA sparks successful ‘shop local’ holiday passport program

in Around Town/Business/Community/Local News by
Melissa McFarland and Charlie McDonald of the Lindsay Downtown BIA.

On November 16, 2018, the Lindsay Downtown BIA launched the Holiday Passport program, to encourage both the local community and visitors to take advantage of everything downtown Lindsay has to offer during the holiday season.

Running for six weeks, the program drew to a close on December 20, with a draw for massive gift baskets. In the weeks before, the Lindsay Downtown BIA’s marketing committee pounded the downtown sidewalks, pitching the idea to the local merchants, who almost unanimously supported the idea.

Each merchant was provided with a stack of blank passports and a unique stamp, and the promotion kicked off the weekend of the Santa Claus parade – the unofficial start to the holiday season. Instantly appealing to the local residents, the passport provided an incentive for shopping local during the holiday season.

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Housing and homelessness plan review, update and survey

in Community/Local News/Poverty Reduction by

Provincial legislation has established the City responsible for the administration of housing and homelessness programs and services for both the City of Kawartha Lakes and the County of Haliburton. In this capacity, the City is called the Service Manager. The province requires Service Managers to develop a 10-year Housing and Homelessness Plan (“the Plan”). The Plan establishes priorities for housing and homelessness services based on targeted consultations and research.

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