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Community/Health

Local Family Health Team saves Urgent Care more than $700,000

A costing by the City of Kawartha Lakes Family Health Team has revealed that the team has saved the health care system more than $700,000 since 2014 through its emergency room and after hours clinic diversion programs.

Under these programs, the team’s health care professionals assess whether their care and treatment of the patient in the family health team offices resulted in the patient not having to go to the emergency department or attend local after hours clinics.

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Giving caregivers ‘powerful tools’ to manage

in Columnists/Health/Seniors by
Almost half of those identified as caregivers are also raising their own families.

At first glance, the numbers are overwhelming, until you pause to think about them. It is estimated that in North America, one out of every four households provides caregiving – millions of people taking on care services for a relative or friend over the age of 50.

With our aging population, more and more people find themselves in situations that they may never have imagined. Almost half of those identified as caregivers in our society are also raising their own family simultaneously, and two-thirds work either full- or part-time. The added pressure and stress of caregiving responsibilities are not easy to handle.

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The violin bowmaker and his mystery machine

in Around Town/Columnists/Community by
George MacArthur, professional bowmaker and inventor.

“I like high precision and ultimate control over mechanical things.” That’s George MacArthur speaking, and he’s not overstating.

George is a professional bowmaker, one of maybe 14 in Canada (his estimate). Some of his bows are in the capable hands of musicians such as Natalie MacMaster and the Leahy family.

From planks of Pernambuco snakewood and wamara — exotic species chosen for their high “Modulus of Elasticity” (inherent stiffness) and other qualities — George fashions violin sticks. The mathematically calculated tapers are precise to two thousandths of an inch. (That’s less than the thickness of a sheet of paper.) To the sticks he adds eyelets and screws custom machined from 01 tool steel and creates a hairing system.

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Board finds needed $2 million in estimated teacher sick leave

in Community/Education by
TLDSB Director of Education Larry Hope has reached out to local unions for support.

As the Trillium Lakelands District School Board grapples with a $2 million funding shortfall in expected revenues, it found the solution in decreasing the amount of money it is allocating for teacher sick leave.

Director of Education Larry Hope just hopes it wasn’t a one-time solution, and so has reached out to the local union presidents for support.

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For the record: What did Laurie/Jamie do? (Sept. 7, 2018)

in For the Record by
For the record: What did Laurie/Jamie do? Week of Sept. 2, 2018
Ontario Labour Minister Laurie Scott and MP Jamie Schmale.

The Lindsay Advocate is introducing a weekly column to explore what our local MPP and MP did each week on behalf of their constituents. We will highlight how our representatives voted and what issues they talked about during the week. In the case of Labour Minister Laurie Scott, as a minister we will also highlight elements relevant to her portfolio and her government’s work that directly affects Kawartha Lakes.

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Local man draws attention to ‘awful’ litter near Rainbow Bridge in Lindsay

in Around Town/Community/Environment by
Local man uses Facebook to draw attention to 'awful' litter in Lindsay
Trash near Lindsay's Rainbow Bridge, off a side path. Photo: Jason Brain.

Jason Brain is by no means the first local resident to be dismayed by litter in our community and take action. We have had ‘adopted roads’ in several parts of the city for years. Every spring, for example, the Fenelon Falls Rotary Club cleans up the ditches along part of CKL Road 8 going out of Fenelon.

Many other organizations, businesses, families and individuals do the same throughout our city and have done so for years: Taking personal time and effort to clean what is public land. And just ask anyone who owns property along alternate routes to our dumps – they are constantly picking up for other inconsiderate — and let’s face it — criminal people.

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Health Coalition organizes meetings to talk about proposed merger’s impact

in Around Town/Community/Health/Local News/Seniors by
"We believe that the proposed integration will be devastating, with centralized surgeries, rehabilitation and palliative care moved.”

Citizens concerned about the impact of the proposed ‘integration’ of the Ross Memorial Hospital and the Peterborough Regional Health Centre will have the opportunity to attend local meetings and discuss their thoughts on the merger – but these events were not organized by the hospitals.

The two events, organized by the Peterborough Health Coalition and the Ontario Health Coalition, will be held in Lindsay on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 7-9 p.m. at the Christian Fellowship Centre (59 Mary St W.) and in Peterborough on Thursday Sept. 13, 7-9 p.m. at the Peterborough Lions Center (347 Burnham St).

Charlene Avon, local organizer and a board member of the Ontario Health Coalition, says the events will provide residents with an opportunity to “voice their concerns and tell their stories.” OHC Executive Director Natalie Mehra and local activists will be speaking at both events.

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Letham signs joint letter requesting Feds take over Basic Income Pilot

in Community/Poverty Reduction/Seniors by
Will the Federal government finish up Ontario's Basic Income Pilot?

City of Kawartha Lakes Mayor Andy Letham, Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger along with Chris Friel, Mayor of Brantford, and Keith Hobbs, Mayor of Thunder Bay, issued a joint letter to Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development expressing their concern with the sudden cancellation of the Basic Income Pilot Program and their united request to the Federal Government to assume oversight of the project.

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Back To School: Post-Secondary pursuits, past and present

in Education/Just in Time by
Trent University is one of a few popular post-secondary choices for local graduates.

A familiar ritual plays out across Kawartha Lakes on the first Tuesday of September. It’s a ritual that most of us have participated in – sometimes grudgingly, often anxiously. For those living in the countryside, this ritual involves waiting at the end of a long laneway for a yellow bus.

For those in town, it involves making a five, 10, 15, or 20-minute journey by foot, or occasionally by car. Parents reassure their children that they will do well on their first day of Kindergarten, while down the street their teen-aged counterparts are gaily exchanging pleasantries about their summer break, and comparing notes about who is taking what classes this semester.

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Second World War-era biplane may fly over Kawartha Lakes next year

in Around Town/Community/Just in Time by
In the 1950s, a U.S. citizen purchased the plane, and it ended up as a show plane, starring in TV shows such as CHiPs.

All the components of a Second World War era biplane are sitting in Doug Watson’s garage. While there’s no need for it to fight again, he aims to make it fly in 2019.

Two years ago. Watson, who lives just north of Lindsay, found himself in possession of a chaotic heap of disassembled airplane parts. It meant that he had embroiled himself in a years-long construction project – and he couldn’t be happier.

The plane itself is Tiger Moth biplane; bi, of course, refers to the two wings on each side of of the cockpit that are stacked on top of one another. The plane was invented in the 1930s and quickly became mass produced in the wake of a global war.

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Seven reasons why we need trees

in Columnists/Environment by
Seven reasons why we need trees
Often, trees are cut down with hope that this will increase the farm’s bottom line, without realizing that trees are essential to maintaining healthy fields.

We have all noticed it lately while driving around the Kawartha Lakes. A farm goes up for sale. Once sold, the big machines go in and cut down the trees between the fields, often piling them up into piles for burning. Then the spring rains come. The field, without trees, doesn’t drain well. There are new boggy areas. The new landowner, at considerable expense, has someone come in to lay the long plastic pipes to tile, or drain, the field, in hopes that this will solve the problem. But this is not the only problem that has been created.

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