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Free public discussion on basic income at Fleming College

in Around Town/Community/Poverty Reduction by
Free public discussion on basic income at Fleming College

The Ontario Basic Income Network (OBIN) is hosting a free public discussion on basic income in early November at Fleming College’s Frost Campus in Lindsay.

The Nov. 3 event is a chance to explore how basic income might benefit the town, according to Chair of OBIN’s provisional steering committee, Rob Rainer.

“The public event is an opportunity to explore the various ways basic income could really help the people of Lindsay,” he says.

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John A. Macdonald would have supported basic income

in Columnists/Poverty Reduction by
John A. Macdonald would have supported basic income

If there’s one thing Prime Minister John A. Macdonald could do exceptionally well, it was to recognize where the political winds were blowing. That’s not a criticism. The most able of politicians help move societies where they actually want to go anyway. Leaders and governments merely ensure a smooth transition, if they are doing their jobs well.

The fascinating rise of basic income policy in Canada — and the desperate need for it — is something our sage first leader would have seen coming.

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First sign-ups for basic income in Lindsay on Oct. 12-13

in Community/Local News/Poverty Reduction by
Frost out, Celebrations in, as basic income meeting adapts to college strike
Up to $16,989 per year for a single person.

Enrollment in Ontario’s basic income pilot gets underway in Lindsay next week.

In-person enrollment sessions will begin Oct. 12-13 where people can complete applications to be part of the pilot.

Minister of Community and Social Services, Dr. Helena Jaczek, was in Lindsay this week touring and visited A Place Called Home, a 19-bed hostel for homeless single adults, couples and families with children. Jaczek spoke with staff and individuals there, about how they could benefit from the pilot. A Place Called Home is one of the community organizations that is supporting the Ontario Basic Income Pilot.

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Lindsay ‘working poor’ take note: Most basic income sign-ups are employed people

in Community/Poverty Reduction by
Lindsay ‘working poor’ take note: Most basic income sign-ups are employed people
The 'working poor' are embracing basic income.

About two thirds of basic income sign-ups so far have come from the so-called ‘working poor,’ a fact Lindsay residents who are struggling should take note of as it begins to unfold here.

Ontario’s Minister of Community and Social Services, Helena Jaczek, and her counterpart, Peter Milczyn, the minister responsible for the poverty reduction strategy and minister of housing, held a press conference in Hamilton earlier this morning to update the public on the basic income pilot.

The basic income pilot is being held in Hamilton/Brant County and Thunder Bay, which began during the summer, and in Lindsay, which will begin this fall.

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Police Chief John Hagarty talks fentanyl, building community, and basic income

in Community/Local News/Poverty Reduction by
Police Chief John Hagarty talks fentanyl, building community, and basic income

It’s the last year for John Hagarty as Lindsay’s chief of police, given his imminent retirement next fall, and it’s not shaping up to be an easy one.

The wave of fentanyl and other opioid-related deaths that has been surging across Canada has finally hit small-town Ontario – including Lindsay, Kawartha Lakes, and nearby Peterborough.

Hagarty knew it was coming to Kawartha Lakes. It was only a matter of time. Not only is there fentanyl to worry about, there is a far deadlier version known as carfentanil – a synthetic heroin laced with elephant tranquilizers, and 100 times more potent than regular fentanyl. Just a few granules are enough to be lethal, and they can easily be hidden within other drugs.

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Fleming president says college tries to stay on top of skills employers need

in Business/Education by
Fleming president says college tries to stay on top of skills employers need
Fleming wants to address Lindsay's skills shortage.

One of the key challenges for Lindsay and Kawartha Lakes is the growing skills shortage. It’s affecting area employers who can’t find the right people, and of course it’s not good for the people who can’t find the right job.

Sir Sandford Fleming College President, Tony Tilly, is aware of the skills shortage phenomenon affecting Lindsay and other small towns that have seen their manufacturing base shrink.

“We’ve been aware of this issue for a number of years,” Tilly says, pointing out that the college system commissioned a report in 2010 entitled ‘People Without Jobs, Jobs Without People.’

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Do Millennials in Lindsay lack a good worth ethic?

in Business/Community by
Do Millennials in Lindsay lack a good worth ethic?
Do Millennials lack a solid work ethic?

“They seem to think highly of themselves.”

“Too over-confident.”

“They have a ‘baby-on-board’ protected mentality.”

“They’re always connected to their phones.”

The above was actual employer feedback from a large area employer about the young people sent to Victoria County Career Services (VCCS). It wasn’t the only business feedback.

Millennials also:

  • “Expect to move into the same job someone else has had for years.”
  • “They question everything.”
  • “They have less patience” for repetitive tasks, if the tasks aren’t meaningful.
  • “They have an expectation to be paid well.”
  • “They don’t like authoritarian style” of employers.
  • “They’re needy.”

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Every employee has mental health; how’s yours?

in Columnists/Health by
Every employee has mental health; how's yours?

The average Canadian spends roughly 40 hours per week at work. Those days are often spent filing, lifting, sweating, serving or teaching. Some may enjoy their work; others may spend their work days dreaming of how they’ll spend their downtime.

What every employee has in common though is that each and every one of them has mental health. Everyone has mental health. A spectrum that flows fluidly from being mentally healthy, to even potentially mentally ill. While we all live with that mental health spectrum, approximately one in five will experience mental distress in a given year.

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Today, more than ever, we’re stronger together

in Business/Columnists by
Today, more than ever, we’re stronger together
Home of the Lindsay and District Chamber of Commerce.

“What have you done for me lately?”

Chambers of commerce across Ontario have a long-standing challenge in letting local businesses know all the benefits of being part of their local chamber.

“Of course I joined the local chamber; it’s just what businesses do.”

While the support is appreciated, this simply isn’t enough anymore. Chambers of commerce need to offer a business case – a value proposition – of what they offer and ways for business owners to showcase their work and engage in what’s going on in the local business community.

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