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Kawartha Lakes Classic raises funds for A Place Called Home

in Around Town/Community/Poverty Reduction by
On Saturday 273 cyclists experienced the countryside up-close. Photo: Jamie Morris.

On Saturday morning 273 cyclists experienced the countryside up-close, rolling along the quiet back roads that knit together our region. It was the 15th Annual Kawartha Lakes Classic Cycling Tour, a fundraiser for A Place Called Home.

Cyclists had come from as far away as Ottawa and Niagara; in fact, roughly half were visiting from outside Kawartha Lakes. (Days Inn was the official hotel sponsor).

When they registered, the cyclists chose a distance, each with its own route.  For the experienced and ambitious there were 100 and 160 km routes. A 50 km route wound its way to Woodville and back. And the 25 and 13 km tours made use of sections of the Kawartha TransCanada Trail. All departed from Boston Pizza (which, along with Canadian Tire, was an   official sponsor).

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How much is enough? The politics of capitalism and wealth

in Business/Columnists/Poverty Reduction by
David Thomson, who according to Canadian Business, has a family net worth of more than $41 Billion.

Many of us who work at The Advocate spend a lot of time thinking about how life could be better for people in our Kawartha Lakes community, and for all Canadians. That is, how do we achieve a more equitable society, within a capitalism framework, where there isn’t such a great chasm between the wealthiest and the poorest?

When we consider these questions we refer to the kind of wealth that defies all sense of decency. As of June 8 last year, the world’s richest five men owned over $400 billion in wealth. Thus, on average, each man owns nearly as much as 750 million people.

As I wrote in a feature story in last month’s Advocate, too many of us from all political stripes seem to believe that the ‘free market’ needs to be left alone to do its thing to make lives better for people. It is the ‘trickle down’ lie that has been perpetuated for decades, all the while inequality continues to increase.

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Health Unit urges Province to reverse basic income cancellation

in Community/Health/Poverty Reduction by
A rally Aug. 7 drew several hundred people to Victoria Park. Photo: Pamela Cornell.

The local Health Unit is strongly urging the Ontario government to reverse course and at least see the Basic Income Guarantee through to the end of its original three-year pilot phase.

A letter containing this message has been sent to the provincial government on behalf of the Haliburton Kawartha Pine Ridge (HKPR) Board of Health, which in 2016 endorsed a position statement calling for a Basic Income Guarantee pilot program in Ontario. The position statement cited the fact that eliminating poverty is an urgent public health issue, as people on low income are more likely to have health problems and die younger than people with higher income.

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Municipal candidates begin to speak out on broken basic income promise

in Community/Poverty Reduction by

Just two days ago over the long weekend the Lindsay Advocate invited municipal candidates to share their opinion about the pilot’s cancellation. The Advocate also invited them to the basic income rally being held Aug. 7 at 12:30 pm in Victoria Park.

Pat Warren, candidate for Ward 6, says she may be unable to make the rally on Tuesday but says it was “unfortunate that the pilot project was cancelled.”

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Laurie Scott, PCs, say basic income too costly if expanded to all Ontario

in Community/Local News/Poverty Reduction by
Scott says basic income would be too costly if expanded to all Ontario
Minister of Labour Laurie Scott and Mike Perry, Basic Income advocate.

Local MPP and Minister of Labour Laurie Scott says there were “too many concerns” about the Ontario Basic Income Pilot to let it go on — but then also noted if it were successful it would have been too expensive to implement Ontario-wide.

Scott, who was responding to questions provided by the Lindsay Advocate, made the seemingly contradictory remarks in her emailed response, although she wasn’t the only one. The lead minister on this file, Lisa MacLeod, said the same thing yesterday, in an effort to stem the growing pressure to see the decision reversed.

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Myth busting two big lies as we fight to keep basic income alive

in Columnists/Community/Poverty Reduction by
Just 87 people in Canada have more wealth than 12 million Canadians.

As advocates, we are fighting hard to keep the basic income program alive here in Lindsay. We are heartened by the strong support coming in, and yet we are also dismayed by comments that constantly circle around two big lies.

One is the idea that we can’t afford the pilot program.

The other is that the poor are ultimately lazy.

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Heart-breaking stories pour into Advocate as PCs break basic income promise

in Community/Health/Poverty Reduction by
"It will be devastating."

They are young and old, parents and grandparents. They are business owners who needed a leg up and disabled people who thought they had a chance to live in dignity, thanks to the Ontario Basic Income Program.

Instead, they have been blind-sided by an ideological decision from the new Progressive Conservative government to cancel a three-year-pilot already underway — but advocates aren’t giving it up without a fight. Minister of Children, Community and Social Services Lisa MacLeod has admitted to media this is the first broken promise of the new PC government. Meanwhile, The Lindsay Advocate has yet to hear from local MPP Laurie Scott who was recently appointed Minister of Labour in the new government.

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Basic Income gone: Ford’s abrupt cancellation of program devastates Lindsay

in Columnists/Poverty Reduction by
Basic Income gone: Ford’s abrupt cancellation of program devastates Lindsay

All over Ontario PC Leader Doug Ford promised over and over that “a new day will dawn in Ontario,” should he be elected, “for the people.”

Well, here’s his new day dawning for about 2,000 people who live in Lindsay, their lives just starting to be changed for the better by basic income — and it’s not the kind of day they were expecting.

Here’s his new day dawning for Roseanne Johnson who says she can’t survive without that money, and that she and her son will “soon be on the streets.”  Or Lauretta Blackman who saw her grandchildren for the first time because she finally had enough money for transportation.

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A story of the Rohingya refugee crisis from a Lindsay perspective

in Columnists/Community/Poverty Reduction by

The numbers are staggering. Over 700,000 Rohingya refugees, many of them children and women, have taken shelter in Bangladesh to escape wholesale slaughter, rape, and burning of their villages in Myanmar — systematic violence that the United Nations has described as as a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing.”

The descriptions of their conditions are moving. Read, for example, this, from the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHRC) website: “They have walked for days through jungles and mountains, or braved dangerous sea voyages across the Bay of Bengal . . . Monsoon and cyclone season has arrived . . . Thousands of refugees will face grave risk of landslides and floods.”

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Kawartha Lakes Cycling Classic: Annual ride for A Place Called Home

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The annual Kawartha Lakes Cycling Classic returns Aug. 25 to Lindsay, as riders from across the region ride for A Place Called Home (APCH).

This year’s event promises to be bigger than ever. With courses of varying intensities, (13, 25, 50, 100, and 160 kilometres) the event offers both veteran and novice, casual and competitive cyclists a chance to ride for a great cause in the local community.

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