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Poverty Reduction

Minimum wage increase stings, says Olympia Restaurant, Home Hardware

in Business/Community/Poverty Reduction by
Minimum wage increase stings, says Olympia Restaurant, Home Hardware
The Olympia Restaurant has been a Lindsay fixture for more than a century.

Lindsay and District Labour Council leader says minimum wage should never have been frozen in the first place.

Nicki Dedes and her family have ensured the Olympia Restaurant has been a downtown fixture in Lindsay for more than 100 years. The owner operator is used to “living on edge” in the restaurant business, given that profit margins in the industry are even lower than they are in retail – about three per cent.

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Majority of basic income applicants continue to be low income workers

in Around Town/Community/Poverty Reduction by
The government is looking for 2,000 people from Lindsay to become basic income applicants and start receiving more income. (Photo: Jerry Holder.)

As basic income enrollments continue in Lindsay and two other Ontario cities, one key trend seems to be emerging – the so-called ‘working poor’ are the majority of applicants who are flocking to the Province’s new Ontario pilot.

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A personal note from the publisher about The Lindsay Advocate

in Columnists/Community/Poverty Reduction by
A personal note from the publisher about The Lindsay Advocate
Photo by Jerry Holder.

It has been four short months since The Lindsay Advocate launched and it feels like we already belong here. For that, we owe thanks to all our readers.

Our focus has been – and will continue to be – on the social and economic wellness of Lindsay. With growth, we are open to extending that vision to all of Kawartha Lakes.

Readers have responded to this vision in droves and that tells us we are responding to genuine community need.

The inspiration for The Advocate comes from two places.

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King Albert: Lindsay school works with community to overcome income barriers

in Community/Health/Poverty Reduction by
King Albert Public School Principal, Dean Burke, with some of the items received for Christmas donations. Over 20 families were supported through the community partners who support the school.

Part Two. This year, Statistics Canada has released new data on the social and economic well-being of cities and towns across Canada. This is part two in a series about Lindsay’s 12 lowest income neighbourhood zones and how they are coping in a challenging economic environment. To read Part One go here.

This is a story about a community coming together to fight an all-too-common scourge – the fact that incomes are too low to meet people’s needs.

Call it poverty. Call it scarcity. It doesn’t much matter.

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Kawartha Credit Union again supports Food For Kids program

in Around Town/Community/Poverty Reduction by
Kawartha Credit Union again supports Food For Kids program
Food For Kids Coordinator Jennifer Armitage, far left, accepts a $3,000 cheque from staff at Kawartha Credit Union in Lindsay.

While this gift isn’t from the North Pole, it is still being received with holiday cheer by supporters of local programs that support student nutrition at school. Kawartha Credit Union in Lindsay is being recognized for its recent $3,000 donation to support the work of Food For Kids City of Kawartha Lakes.

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The week before Christmas at A Place Called Home

in Around Town/Community/Poverty Reduction by
Christmas at A Place Called Home
A Place Called Home staff members, Christina Alden (left) and Jennifer Lopinski (right).

As families settle into holiday mode its worth reflecting on the fact that not everyone has a place to live – even in a small town like Lindsay.

Just four days before Christmas, there are 17 people in town – three of them children under 12 – who are homeless. Fortunately, they’ve got A Place Called Home to get them through what is hopefully a temporary situation.

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Basic income and the future of work: Potential for social disruption

in Columnists/Poverty Reduction by
Basic income and the future of work: Potential for social disruption

I have always loved school.  After high school I attended university and several years after graduation I completed a graduate degree. Wanting to dive into peace and justice issues, I returned to university at age 50.

Formal education has enriched my life and opened doors to new types of work. One of the things I learned, as a literacy practitioner is that not everyone was as keen about the value of school.

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Wanted: 2,000 people from Lindsay who need a better income

in Columnists/Poverty Reduction by
Wanted: 2,000 people from Lindsay who need a better income
Minister of Poverty Reduction and Housing, Peter Milczyn, with Lindsay Advocate Publisher, Roderick Benns.

If you live in Lindsay and you’re finding it difficult to make ends meet, you owe it to yourself to sign up for basic income.

There’s still time.

It doesn’t matter if you’re on Ontario Works, ODSP, or you have a job and you’re just not making enough. You might even be a start-up business owner. But for whatever reason, you’re not making enough to get by — and you need a better income.

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Boys and Girls Club a beacon for many Lindsay families in low-income areas

in Community/Health/Poverty Reduction by
Boys and Girls Club a beacon for many Lindsay families in low-income areas
Heather McCullough, left, and Christine Borrowman, right, of Boys and Girls Club of Kawartha Lakes.

Part One.  This year, Statistics Canada has released new data on the social and economic well-being of cities and towns across Canada. This is part one in a series about Lindsay’s 12 lowest income neighbourhood zones and how they are coping in a challenging economic environment.

This is a series about the challenge and burden of living on a low income in Lindsay, but it’s also a series about hope and action. In each of these designated areas, there is a community anchor of some kind – be it a school, a business, or an institution that helps in some way.

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‘What can I give them, poor as I am?’: Lindsay’s 1931 Citizens’ Relief Association

in Columnists/Community/Just in Time/Poverty Reduction by
From the Toronto Star archives, circa 1933, showing a woodpile behind the old Lindsay Town Hall, ready to be chopped up by transients in exchange for food.

On July 12 of this year, a number of local citizens gathered in the Academy Theatre for a screening of I, Daniel Blake.

The fourth installment in this year’s TIFF Films on the Scugog series, organized under the auspices of the Kawartha Art Gallery in collaboration with the Academy Theatre, I, Daniel Blake paints a poignant picture of poverty in contemporary Britain.

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