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New book on basic income should be required reading: Review

in Community/Education/Poverty Reduction by

Once in a while a mainstream public policy book comes along that has the potential to be a game changer of information, analysis, and sound reasoning. Even rarer is when that same book can strike a warm and inviting tone, beckoning the reader into what feels like a private discussion.

Basic Income for Canadians: The Key to a Healthier, Happier, More Secure Life for All (published by Lorimer) should not be private, though – it should be required reading for every federal and provincial bureaucrat, every municipal politician, and every business owner. It should be on the must-read list for every Canadian who has even the slightest interest in where our nation is headed, and where it could be.

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Community Support Month at Community Care

in Columnists/Community/Health by
Meals on Wheels program – more than a meal
Community Support Services like Meals on Wheels is integral.

October is “Community Support Month” as designated by the Ontario Community Support Association (OCSA). As a community support agency, the Community Care Health & Care Network has been a member of OCSA since the provincial organization was founded in the early 1990s.

Community Support Month provides an opportunity to shine the spotlight on the Community Support Services (CSS) area within Community Care. These are the programs and services designed to help seniors and adults with special needs lead more active, socially engaged, independent lives, and give caregivers much-needed respite and support.

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When local politics gets ugly — and most likely illegal

in Business/Community/Local News by
Andy Letham, Gord James, Brian Junkin, Peter Weygang.

A rather thick document — that purports to be a ‘report’ on Mayor Andy Letham — is now circulating amongst some members of the public. The document is clearly professionally produced and is ring-bound, containing approximately 300 pages. It is also accompanied by a 19-page summary ‘report’, which is basically a repeat of any original material in the larger document.

The Lindsay Advocate became aware of this document on Saturday, September 22 from mayoral candidate Peter Weygang. On Sunday, September 23, Advocate Publisher Roderick Benns met with Weygang, who in turn had invited mayoral candidates’ Gord James and Brian Junkin to discuss this for about 30 minutes.

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Challenge and change in Kawartha Lakes

in Columnists/Community/Health/Poverty Reduction by
From hospital merger talk, to the municipal election, to the cancellation of basic income, it's a time of challenge and change.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions, Won’t be nothing, Nothing you can measure anymore…

— Leonard Cohen, The Future

It has been a challenging time, filled with community outrage, political deception, and collective anxiety, here in Kawartha Lakes.

Basic Income

The cancellation of the Ontario Basic Income Pilot was not only a broken promise, it was colossally stupid. As a society we had a chance to try something new to deal with poverty and the changing employment landscape.

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Health Unit’s drug strategy captures public concerns and suggests way forward

in Community/Health/Local News by

With a new roadmap providing direction, local residents can join the journey to help tackle and reduce harm associated with drug and alcohol use in the area. The newly-renamed Haliburton, Kawartha Lakes, Northumberland (HKLN) Drug Strategy has released results of a community survey involving more than 600 residents and service providers in the City of Kawartha Lakes, Haliburton County and Northumberland County. The roadmap – entitled HKLN Community Priorities Report 2018 – captures public concerns in the three counties about substance use-related harm and lists priorities on how to better address these concerns.

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Five reasons to support Tibetan dinner at the Armoury in Lindsay

in Around Town/Community/Local News by

All is set for Lindsay’s 15th annual Machik Dinner, an event that has introduced many to Tibetan food and culture and over the years raised $300,000 to support the educational work of an organization founded and led by a remarkable local family, the Rabgeys.

The dinner will be held at the Victoria Park Armoury on Saturday, October 13, with a bazaar and silent auction starting at 5 pm and the dinner itself at 6 pm.

In recent years roughly 200 have purchased the tickets. If you haven’t been among them, here are five reasons you might want to join in this year:

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Basic Income: A lost opportunity for Lindsay business owners

in Community/Local News/Poverty Reduction by
Basic Income: A lost opportunity for Lindsay business owners

“Mankind was my business. The common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance, benevolence, were all my business.”

Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

When she got her BA in psychology and English, Suzanne McCarthy figured a decent education would open the right doors so that she would be set in life. Not in the kind of way where great riches are expected, but because of the simple notion that higher education has always promised a solid life, with economic stability.

In a modern, capitalist society like Canada’s, education is meant to be the great equalizer, no matter one’s socio-economic place.

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A critical look at the safety of online voting

in Community/Local News by
A critical look at the safety of online voting

Like over 190 other municipalities in the province, the City of Kawartha Lakes has moved to an internet/telephone telephone voting system and done away with the traditional paper ballot system, after a decision of council in 2017.

The rationale for the move, explained on the City’s website, seems laudable: a convenient system that offers automatic tabulation that increases accessibility, accuracy and efficiency. A willingness to try new systems and processes should be commended. But we can’t — as engaged citizens — just trust that a new system is good because it’s new, even if all the other municipalities are doing it.

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New TLDSB superintendent of business services

in Education by

Trillium Lakelands District School Board (TLDSB) trustees approved the appointment of Tim Ellis as the board’s new superintendent of business services, replacing Bob Kaye who will be retiring after working for 28 years with the board.

Ellis will be responsible for system fiscal management and accountability, as well as leadership of facility and transportation departments.

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How to eat local all winter long

in Columnists/Community/Environment/Health by

It was a hot evening when we visited with José after his shift in the papaya factory in Belize. We were there to hear his story: how he had grown up in a small village close by, how he had cultivated corn for tortillas on communal village land, and beans, squash, peppers and greens in a garden behind his thatched hut.

Then the papaya company moved in and the government forced him and the other villagers off their land so that papaya could be grown instead. José now works at the papaya factory for very low wages. Not only does he have to buy his food in the town, he now also has to pay rent.

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