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A good reference is an important part of job search success

in Business/Opinion by

At some point during your job search you will need to provide references. A reference is someone who can vouch for the skills and experience you say you have on your resume. Most employers will check references. It’s good to line up your references when you start your job search. That means calling the person you want to use as a reference and asking their permission to use their name and contact information.

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Luis and Leanna Segura: Fresh food, hip hop and climbing for mangoes

in Around Town/Business/Community/Local News/Opinion by
Luis and Leanna Segura, the two “Ls” in “FueLL”. Photo: Jamie Morris.

After Christmas excesses ‘tis now the season for New Year’s resolutions. If healthier eating and food choices that have a lower impact on the environment top your list, you might want to kick off your new regime by dropping in to Fresh FueLL on Kent Street.

Inside, you’ll probably find Luis and Leanna Segura, the two “Ls” in “FueLL” and motive force of the business, now beginning its fourth year.

When I drop in one chilly morning the Seguras take time to sit down with me at a table by a wall entirely taken up by a blackboard covered with colourful chalk sketches and “Fun Facts” about everything from avocados to veganism.

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Save community banks, save the post office: Time for postal banking in Canada

in Business/Community/Opinion/Poverty Reduction/Seniors by
The big banks are getting out of smaller communities. Is it time for postal banking?

One of the first things that the new Dominion of Canada did as a country, way back in April 1868, was create a postal bank. The idea was to create a banking system that everyday Canadians could access easily – and to serve customers that the established banks at the time showed little interest in serving. Postal banking existed in Canada until 1968.

All of the stakeholders of the postal system (Canada Post; Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) and the Canadian Postmasters and Assistants Association (CPAA) have examined the idea of re-establishing a postal bank. The CUPW and CPAA research relies heavily on the research of consultant John Anderson. His 82-page Why Canada Needs Postal Banking published by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives contains some of the most detailed research on the topic.

Make no mistake: this is research funded by CUPW. And let’s face it: CUPW are a bit of a polarizing entity at the moment. So it’s perhaps not the most strategic time to be advocating for an increased role and more responsibilities for Canada Post — and its workers — in our life. The most recent strike no doubt rankled many of us, especially those of us waiting for Christmas gifts ordered online. And we are about to get another postage increase. On Jan. 14, 2019 a stamp bought in bulk will cost 90 cents. An individual stamp will cost us $1.05. That we can — in a time of $7 coffees — mail a letter from anywhere in Canada to anywhere in Canada for a measly $1.05 will be lost on those who use any excuse to bash Canada Post. I mean $1.05! That’s a whole nickel more than a non-existent buck-a-beer! But I digress.

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GM Oshawa to close: Reports

in Business/Community by

Hundreds of people across the City of Kawartha Lakes will be affected if GM Oshawa shuts down its operations after 2019, as is being widely reported on multiple media outlets.

On Unifor’s website, a statement is posted that says a significant restructuring announcement will be made by GM on Monday, November 26, 2018 at approximately 10 a.m.”

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Need work? Most top 10 hard skills could be learned in Kawartha Region

in Business/Community/Education/Poverty Reduction by
About 44.3 per cent of residents in Kawartha Lakes have just their high school diploma or less education.

A new study breaks down 10 “highly sought hard skills” in the Kawartha Lakes region – and Fleming College can teach most of them.

With Kawartha Lakes grappling with a high unemployment rate and low wages, this first-ever report of its kind shows a potential path forward for many who live in this area– if they get the right education and skills.

The report was produced by the Workforce Development Board (WDB) under the Local Employment Planning Council (LEPC) pilot. The report covers employment aspects related to Kawartha Lakes, Northumberland County, Peterborough County and Haliburton County. In our last article on this theme we focused on the job and income challenges in Kawartha Lakes.

Since the report also talked about the hard skills that were needed, the Advocate contacted Fleming College to find out how many of these hard skills could be matched up though local post-secondary education opportunities.

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Advocate takes third place Innovation Award through KLCFDC

in Around Town/Business/Community by
The Advocate's multimedia experience helped it win an Innovation Award through the KLCFDC.

The Lindsay Advocate took third place in the Kawartha Lakes Community Futures Development Corporation (KLCFDC) 2018 Innovation Awards, held at the Lindsay Golf Club.

The Awards were part of the KLCFDC’s Innovation Day event, which featured a presentation on digitization from the Business Development Bank, the twentieth anniversary of the KLCFDC’s  annual small business Innovation Awards competition, and an address by Haliburton-Kawartha Lakes-Brock MPP and Minster of Labour Laurie Scott.

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Canada’s supply management system ensures stability for Kawartha Lakes’ farmers

in Business/Community by
Keith Thurston, left, and son, Jeff Thurston, right of Thursthill Farms in Kawartha Lakes. Photo: Erin Smith.

Jim Callaghan was just 8 to 10 years old when the family loaded up the cream they expected to sell to Silverwood’s in Lindsay, a now defunct dairy company. But on that day the company officials shook their heads and sent the Callaghan’s on their way. There would be no dairy sales for the family on that attempt, since Silverwood’s had a glut of supply that day. These were the days before ‘supply management,’ the admittedly boring name for the system that has brought financial stability to Canadian farmers for decades.

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Ubisoft launches major new video game with Kawartha Lakes roots

in Around Town/Business/Community/Local News by
Ubisoft launches major new video game that has Kawartha Lakes roots
Players will build custom starships and explore the Atlas star system.

The Atlas star system is 430.5 light years away from the City of Kawartha Lakes, but its defense begins on Tuesday, October 16 with a game that has roots in the Kawartha Lakes like few before it. Starlink: Battle for Atlas will be released on October 16 by Ubisoft, one of the biggest video game companies in the world, famous for the likes of the Far Cry, Assassin’s Creed, and Tom Clancy series, to name a few. Starlink is a “toys to life” game (Skylanders being the most famous example of this), in which users will build ships out of real toys and bring them into the game. The game is the brainchild of producer and Lindsay ex-pat, Matthew Rose.

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When local politics gets ugly — and most likely illegal

in Business/Community/Local News by
Andy Letham, Gord James, Brian Junkin, Peter Weygang.

A rather thick document — that purports to be a ‘report’ on Mayor Andy Letham — is now circulating amongst some members of the public. The document is clearly professionally produced and is ring-bound, containing approximately 300 pages. It is also accompanied by a 19-page summary ‘report’, which is basically a repeat of any original material in the larger document.

The Lindsay Advocate became aware of this document on Saturday, September 22 from mayoral candidate Peter Weygang. On Sunday, September 23, Advocate Publisher Roderick Benns met with Weygang, who in turn had invited mayoral candidates’ Gord James and Brian Junkin to discuss this for about 30 minutes.

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Independent coffee shop has become vibrant community hub

in Business/Business Profiles/Community/Opinion by
Boiling Over is a big supporter of the arts community, with its open mic nights on the third Friday of each month. Photo: Roderick Benns.

On any given day it’s easy to see the City’s business getting done. No, we’re not at City Hall right now in your faithful scribe’s scenario. We are, in fact, at Boiling Over’s Coffee Vault in downtown Lindsay.

Meetings take place between City officials here. Economic Development might stop by for a tête-à-tête. Community groups meet to plan their activities. It’s not all business, of course. There’s socializing and debate, conversations and interviews. It’s a mix of millennials, Generation Z, Generation X, and Boomers. (Well, pretty much all ages.)

I’ve seen teachers lesson planning, students doing homework, and artists talking music.

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