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New wine for old wineskins: The changing role of your local museum

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New wine for old wineskins: The changing role of your local museum
Where Duty Leads Commemorative Dinner.

Another calendar year has dawned and with it has come the inevitable litany of resolutions about doing things differently in 2018.  Old habits, as the saying goes, die hard.

We are partial to “the way things were,” and are slow to fill old wineskins with new wine, lest the old wineskins break and leave a mess in our comfortable world of old habits and supposedly unassailable practices. History, said Henry Ford (1863-1947), is bunk.

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A glimpse of Lindsay’s prosperous past

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This undated picture of the Scugog River offers one a glimpse into Lindsay’s prosperous past.

On the right, straddling the embankment between King Street and the Grand Trunk Railway’s river spur, is the large and active Allen & Hanburys Co. Ltd., a British-based manufacturer of pharmaceutical products, whose Canadian plant was built in Lindsay a century ago.

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‘What can I give them, poor as I am?’: Lindsay’s 1931 Citizens’ Relief Association

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From the Toronto Star archives, circa 1933, showing a woodpile behind the old Lindsay Town Hall, ready to be chopped up by transients in exchange for food.

On July 12 of this year, a number of local citizens gathered in the Academy Theatre for a screening of I, Daniel Blake.

The fourth installment in this year’s TIFF Films on the Scugog series, organized under the auspices of the Kawartha Art Gallery in collaboration with the Academy Theatre, I, Daniel Blake paints a poignant picture of poverty in contemporary Britain.

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St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church

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St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church

Built in 1886 and opened in 1887 for a parish dating to 1835, St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church has long been a fixture in the community.

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They were called in from the glen: Remembering our Great War nursing sisters

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A stroll through Lindsay’s Riverside Cemetery is always a rewarding experience for the amateur historian, particularly when they happen upon the marker of a well-known local resident like Sir Sam Hughes (1853-1921), Canada’s controversial Minister of Militia and local Member of Parliament.

A few yards away lies the plot of the Hon. Leslie Frost (1895-1973), one-time Member of Provincial Parliament and Premier of Ontario. The Hughes monument is prominently placed on a hillock and is visible almost as soon as one enters the cemetery; Leslie Frost’s final resting place, meanwhile, is marked with a provincial heritage plaque.

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Lindsay’s forgotten artist: Rediscovering W.A. Goodwin

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Lindsay’s forgotten artist: Rediscovering W.A. Goodwin
Our Camp on Crab River, 1898, by W.A. Goodwin.

Autumn is perhaps my favourite season. The palette of hues which grace the Kawartha Lakes between September and mid-November have inspired both outdoor enthusiasts and artists for generations. One such artist was W.A. Goodwin, who, though a Lindsay resident for three quarters of a century, has largely faded into the mists of history.

Well, not entirely.

Lindsay’s forgotten artist: Rediscovering W.A. Goodwin
Columnist Ian McKechnie.

Motorists crossing at the intersection of Cambridge and Peel Streets are no doubt familiar with the badly-neglected frame building on the northwest corner. For years, this once-picturesque structure was home to “Wm. A. Goodwin Room Papers & Picture Frames” ‒ essentially, the ‘Scott’s Decorating Centre’ of its day.

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