News. Community. Wellness.

Category archive

Columnists - page 3

What is Ontario Proud doing in our election?

in Columnists/Community by
What is Ontario Proud doing in our election?
Although some of Denby’s signs have been taken down by Municipal Enforcement -- presumably for violation of the City’s sign Bylaw -- those gorgeous signs at Victoria and Kent Streets are, in fact, legal.

Ontario Proud, the largest digital political advocacy group in the country — and self-described anti-Liberal advocacy group — seems to have taken an interest in the City of Kawartha Lakes’ election.

The Lindsay Advocate has confirmed with Joel Watts, deputy returning officer of the City of Kawartha Lakes that Ontario Proud is not registered as a third party advertiser in this election. The only registered third party advertiser is Bill Denby, who seems to take credit for the ad in the comments section of the second CKL-related video posted so far this election.

Keep Reading

Resume tips that work to find you the job you want

in Business/Columnists by
Resume tips that work to find you the job you want

So you have decided it’s time to find a new job and you need to develop a resume. Where do you start?

Firstly, it’s important to have a career goal or position in mind when you develop your resume. A generic resume is a great start but not likely to get you much notice when you are competing with others.

Keep Reading

Should students have tenants insurance?

in Business/Columnists by
Should students have tenants insurance?

As the new school year is upon us, students are preparing to move away (or move back to) college or university; an important consideration is to have insurance in place that covers your personal belongings, as well as liability.

Some student residences or housing may require you to have your own tenant’s policy, but check first, you may already have coverage under your parents’ property policy. Here are five reasons tenant issuance is a good idea, even when it is not required.

Keep Reading

Community Support Month at Community Care

in Columnists/Community/Health by
Meals on Wheels program – more than a meal
Community Support Services like Meals on Wheels is integral.

October is “Community Support Month” as designated by the Ontario Community Support Association (OCSA). As a community support agency, the Community Care Health & Care Network has been a member of OCSA since the provincial organization was founded in the early 1990s.

Community Support Month provides an opportunity to shine the spotlight on the Community Support Services (CSS) area within Community Care. These are the programs and services designed to help seniors and adults with special needs lead more active, socially engaged, independent lives, and give caregivers much-needed respite and support.

Keep Reading

Challenge and change in Kawartha Lakes

in Columnists/Community/Health/Poverty Reduction by
From hospital merger talk, to the municipal election, to the cancellation of basic income, it's a time of challenge and change.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions, Won’t be nothing, Nothing you can measure anymore…

— Leonard Cohen, The Future

It has been a challenging time, filled with community outrage, political deception, and collective anxiety, here in Kawartha Lakes.

Basic Income

The cancellation of the Ontario Basic Income Pilot was not only a broken promise, it was colossally stupid. As a society we had a chance to try something new to deal with poverty and the changing employment landscape.

Keep Reading

Fighting inequality makes all of society stronger

in Columnists/Community/Poverty Reduction by
Fighting inequality makes all of society stronger
The Nordic countries (like Norway, above) are among the most equal societies.

Like many people concerned about social justice, I read books and online resources about eliminating poverty and inequality.  About five or six years ago I read The Spirit Level: Why Equality is Better for Everyone and I began thinking differently about how we might address poverty.

What was so compelling about the ideas presented in The Spirit Level was that there were countries in which social and health outcomes were positive and these countries happened to be highly equal (as measured by the Gini coefficient). The authors, both epidemiologists, studied a number of health and social outcomes affected by social status. Income, education, or profession defines social status.

Keep Reading

How to eat local all winter long

in Columnists/Community/Environment/Health by

It was a hot evening when we visited with José after his shift in the papaya factory in Belize. We were there to hear his story: how he had grown up in a small village close by, how he had cultivated corn for tortillas on communal village land, and beans, squash, peppers and greens in a garden behind his thatched hut.

Then the papaya company moved in and the government forced him and the other villagers off their land so that papaya could be grown instead. José now works at the papaya factory for very low wages. Not only does he have to buy his food in the town, he now also has to pay rent.

Keep Reading

Giving caregivers ‘powerful tools’ to manage

in Columnists/Health/Seniors by
Almost half of those identified as caregivers are also raising their own families.

At first glance, the numbers are overwhelming, until you pause to think about them. It is estimated that in North America, one out of every four households provides caregiving – millions of people taking on care services for a relative or friend over the age of 50.

With our aging population, more and more people find themselves in situations that they may never have imagined. Almost half of those identified as caregivers in our society are also raising their own family simultaneously, and two-thirds work either full- or part-time. The added pressure and stress of caregiving responsibilities are not easy to handle.

Keep Reading

The violin bowmaker and his mystery machine

in Around Town/Columnists/Community by
George MacArthur, professional bowmaker and inventor.

“I like high precision and ultimate control over mechanical things.” That’s George MacArthur speaking, and he’s not overstating.

George is a professional bowmaker, one of maybe 14 in Canada (his estimate). Some of his bows are in the capable hands of musicians such as Natalie MacMaster and the Leahy family.

From planks of Pernambuco snakewood and wamara — exotic species chosen for their high “Modulus of Elasticity” (inherent stiffness) and other qualities — George fashions violin sticks. The mathematically calculated tapers are precise to two thousandths of an inch. (That’s less than the thickness of a sheet of paper.) To the sticks he adds eyelets and screws custom machined from 01 tool steel and creates a hairing system.

Keep Reading

Independent coffee shop has become vibrant community hub

in Business/Business Profiles/Columnists/Community by
Boiling Over is a big supporter of the arts community, with its open mic nights on the third Friday of each month. Photo: Roderick Benns.

On any given day it’s easy to see the City’s business getting done. No, we’re not at City Hall right now in your faithful scribe’s scenario. We are, in fact, at Boiling Over’s Coffee Vault in downtown Lindsay.

Meetings take place between City officials here. Economic Development might stop by for a tête-à-tête. Community groups meet to plan their activities. It’s not all business, of course. There’s socializing and debate, conversations and interviews. It’s a mix of millennials, Generation Z, Generation X, and Boomers. (Well, pretty much all ages.)

I’ve seen teachers lesson planning, students doing homework, and artists talking music.

Keep Reading

1 2 3 4 5 12
Go to Top